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Quick Reference: Location of Spinal Cord Injuries ... See MoreSee Less

9 hours ago

Quick Reference: Location of Spinal Cord Injuries

You are called to treat a 40 year old male that was involved in an assault. PD states that the scene is secure for you to enter. When you arrive at the patient this is what you see.

What type of injury is this?
How would you treat this patient?

EMTs and Paramedic Students!
Getting near test time, or getting ahead for next year?
Right now you can get 3 months for the price of 2!
Try our 90 day special! Follow the prescribed study methods and have all of the knowledge and mental tips required to destroy the NREMT! Pass on your FIRST TRY - GUARANTEED!
... See MoreSee Less

11 hours ago

You are called to treat a 40 year old male that was involved in an assault. PD states that the scene is secure for you to enter. When you arrive at the patient this is what you see.

What type of injury is this? 
How would you treat this patient?

EMTs and Paramedic Students!
Getting near test time, or getting ahead for next year? 
Right now you can get 3 months for the price of 2! 
Try our 90 day special! Follow the prescribed study methods and have all of the knowledge and mental tips required to destroy the NREMT! Pass on your FIRST TRY - GUARANTEED!

Christie Mercer, Kwanele Msibi and 23 others like this

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Patty Kutscher PalsTrauma/head lac, C-collar, neuro ck, compression dressing non-stick, set of Vitals, Ask about alcohol/drugs, allergies & medications esp any blood thinners, address any other life threats. Rapid transport nearest trauma unit, monitor on the way & apply O2 if necessary.

10 hours ago   ·  4

10 Replies

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Keith BortonAvulsion. PPE/SAFETY, Scene size up. Consider c spine. General impression, control bleed, very vascular area. Avpu, a/b/c, LOC?. apply c spine collar, load/go. Vitals. Depending on patient presentation/vitals start a line, fluid bolus, alert hospital, and reassess. Transport to the appropriate trauma center. Oxygen and fluid bolus may be modified depending if in shock or not but would be cautious of the impending possibility of brain bleed.

9 hours ago   ·  3
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Sam GrecoSmall cut to the head, slap a band-aid on it and give him a hat, then have him sign a refusal and tell him next time remember your wife's birthday!

3 hours ago   ·  3
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Nathan ParsonsPossible closed head injury, c collar if loss of consciousness or altered, assess neuros every 5 with v/s, cover up the avulsion after asking to photo for posterity, transport.

11 hours ago   ·  1
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Chris HolguinAvulsion. Control bleeding, apply sterile dressing, assess other life threats, transport.

11 hours ago   ·  8
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Mahalia CastellTalk to the patient (ABC), AVPU-assess GCS, check c-spine (soft collar if needed) VVS, neuro assess, control bleeding, cover wound with a nonstick bandage (possibly a damp gauze, then bandage) AMPLE-control pain and transport checking neuro assessment and BP regularly.

10 hours ago   ·  1
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Matt Herbertneck tourniquet, everybody wins

10 hours ago   ·  17
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Kevin R FavierTrauma/head lac, C-collar if need after C-spine check, neuro ck, compression dressing non-stick, set of Vitals, Ask about alcohol/drugs, allergies & medications esp any blood thinners, address any other life threats. Rapid transport nearest trauma unit, monitor on the way & apply O2 if necessary.

10 hours ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Ryan JettIf he guess how many fingers you are holding up right....he's good....just needs a band-aid

9 hours ago   ·  1
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Harrison O'ConnellTell him "Oh shit man that looks bad, you should call 911 and get some help" ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚

10 hours ago   ·  5

1 Reply

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Eric AllenAnd he shouldn't piss his drug dealer off in the future

4 hours ago
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Eric AllenThat needs some staples and Motrin. Easy ride to the ER, done deal.

4 hours ago
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Rob GallowayPackage wrap and transport asap to nearest trauma center...could be underlying complications...better safe than sorry.

9 hours ago
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Wil MendozaAn ass whoopin, rub robitussin on it, transport.

11 hours ago   ·  6

2 Replies

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Patrick MurphyAvulsion, control bleeding, dry sterile dressing, and pain management

11 hours ago
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Glenn BrockObviously an attempted avulsiated scalping by the Indians. From the looks of it I'd say Tribal Apache. After precautionary procedures, i.e. stifneck, primary, secondary assessments, Cleanse with adequate amount of warm water, apply non stick sterile dressing, and grace the ER with your presents and trophy.

10 hours ago   ·  3
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Leigh A Miller TribouI think he needs a bandaid. A big bandaid.

11 hours ago   ·  4
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Mellissa FlemingThat's an avulsion. Sterile dressing and wrap.

9 hours ago
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Anne RobertsDress and transport . Collar if thought necc.

4 hours ago
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Myles Kilker

Attachment8 hours ago
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Brian StewartIsraeli bandages are great for head lacs.

6 hours ago
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Jaryd RyanLaceration. SUPERGLUE! Lol

7 hours ago
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Corey BeranJudy McKinley - bleeding looks controlled. Cling film it?

11 hours ago
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Myles KilkerLido, irrigation, and a stapler.

8 hours ago
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James GalliganMag light syndrome

10 hours ago
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Seizures
A seizure is a brief alteration in behavior or consciousness. It is caused by abnormal electrical activity of one or more groups of neurons in the brain. In the prehospital setting, the cause is not as important as other measures including managing the complications and recognizing whether the seizure is reversible with therapy. (e.g.,seizure from hypoglycemia)
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13 hours ago

Seizures
A seizure is a brief alteration in behavior or consciousness. It is caused by abnormal electrical activity of one or more groups of neurons in the brain. In the prehospital setting, the cause is not as important as other measures including managing the complications and recognizing whether the seizure is reversible with therapy. (e.g.,seizure from hypoglycemia)

Alfred Siseho, Marcia Wilson and 23 others like this

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Wesley Fleming4waves to look at on an EEG Theta,Delta,Alpha,Beta and on both hemispheres of the brain

9 hours ago
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15 hours ago

Janet Sparks, Brittany Scroggins and 23 others like this

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Justin StrowbridgeEarn money snacking

14 hours ago   ·  1
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Brian DiCenzoEverything must tangle

13 hours ago
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Randy WrightEmpty My Trash

7 hours ago
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Gary Robert QuinnErasing medical trauma

13 hours ago
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Ethan SterlingCourtney Christine

14 hours ago   ·  1
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Amanda CamposRobert Long

8 hours ago   ·  1
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Dusty SteeleBruce Baker

6 hours ago   ·  1
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Anatomical terms for regions of the body. ... See MoreSee Less

17 hours ago

Anatomical terms for regions of the body.

Hydrocephalus
Hydrocephalus is the buildup of fluid within the ventricles. The excess fluid increases the size of the ventricles causing pressure in the brain. There are 2 types of hydrocephalus congenital and acquired.

Congenital hydrocephalus is present at birth. The causes include genetic problems and problems with how the fetus develops. An unusually large head is the main sign of congenital hydrocephalus.

Acquired hydrocephalus and can occur at any age. The causes can include head injuries, strokes, infections, tumors, and bleeding in the brain.

Symptoms include:
-Headache
-Vomiting and nausea
-Blurry vision
-Balance problems
-Bladder control problems
-Thinking and memory problems
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1 day ago

Hydrocephalus
Hydrocephalus is the buildup of fluid within the ventricles. The excess fluid increases the size of the ventricles causing pressure in the brain. There are 2 types of hydrocephalus congenital and acquired.

Congenital hydrocephalus is present at birth. The causes include genetic problems and problems with how the fetus develops. An unusually large head is the main sign of congenital hydrocephalus.

Acquired hydrocephalus and can occur at any age. The causes can include head injuries, strokes, infections, tumors, and bleeding in the brain.

Symptoms include: 
-Headache
-Vomiting and nausea
-Blurry vision
-Balance problems
-Bladder control problems
-Thinking and memory problems

Determining heart rate through The Sequence Method!

1. Memorize the following sequence: 300,150,100,75,60,50.

2. Find an R wave on a heavy lane in a large box, and count odd "300,150,100,75,60,50" for each large box until you reach the next R wave.
(You can estimate the rate if the second R wave does not fall exactly on a heavy line.)

3. If the R-R interval spans fewer than three larg boxes the rate is greater than 100. If it covers more than five large boxes the rate is less than 60.
*This method should be reserved for regular heart rhythms!
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2 days ago

Determining heart rate through The Sequence Method!

1. Memorize the following sequence: 300,150,100,75,60,50.

2. Find an R wave on a heavy lane in a large box, and count odd 300,150,100,75,60,50 for each large box until you reach the next R wave.
(You can estimate the rate if the second R wave does not fall exactly on a heavy line.)

3. If the R-R interval spans fewer than three larg boxes the rate is greater than 100. If it covers more than five large boxes the rate is less than 60.
*This method should be reserved for regular heart rhythms!

Kim Heiss, Andy Snowball and 23 others like this

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Charlotte AllenCan gladly say I actually know a bit of this after this weekend ๐Ÿ˜ƒ

1 day ago   ·  1
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Steven Kleincount how many complexes are in 30 boxes and add a 0. eg 5 complexes within the 30 boxes would be 50

1 day ago   ·  1
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Gary Robert QuinnI can honestly say I never want to see another ecg, but that's because I had a massive heart attack without warning last Tuesday and I vfibed on the way, the the awesome emt shocked me back to the living. God bless all medical service workers Ye are all amazing!

2 days ago   ·  9

1 Reply

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LiLy Ojeda FloresWow interesting!

2 days ago   ·  2
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Aaron WilsonChristina Brown

2 days ago   ·  1
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Chris DavisJust count the QRS complex from a six second sheet and multiply by ten!!! Easy.

1 day ago   ·  3

1 Reply

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2 days ago

BI NO, Ernest Sedupa and 23 others like this

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Barry HickeyShocking Asystole, terrible spinal immobilization, performing waaaaayyy outside the scope of practice, declaring people dead without even attempting cpr inside of 1 minute of going into traumatic arrest. to name just a few

2 days ago   ·  6
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Erika BarthI try very hard not to do that around people who aren't medical. I found out that its more fun for others if I keep my mouth shut. I learned my lesson about that by watching war movies with my army husband.

2 days ago
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Marlene Elena SangalangMy favorite is when they don't even assess the pt or check the airway, they just begin chest compressions. I also saw a show where an EMT performed a tracheotomy.

2 days ago
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JT LaddDonald Dooley and Michelle Moser Dooley. Doctors and surgeons hate me, but my patients love me. I'm just sayin.

2 days ago

1 Reply

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Reyna HernandezEveryone dnt ever watch a medical/ firefighters show w/ Frankie Hernandez, U would never hear the end of it! ๐Ÿคฃ๐Ÿคฃ

18 hours ago

1 Reply

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Ashlynne RatnerJohn Schatz, this is you when I make you watch greys anatomy

1 day ago   ·  1
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Rebecca ElizabethMelanie Rose Plakstis why we can never watch anything together

2 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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David BlevinsIt's that our job?

2 days ago
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Maggie Dufau-HambergerEvery time.

1 day ago
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Jay PattersonI bet you do this too, don't you Tiffany?

2 days ago

1 Reply

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Ray BennettYup. That's why I don't watch them

2 days ago   ·  1
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Connie PriceMe too!

2 days ago
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BI NO๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ˜REELATE!

3 hours ago
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Faragoza JamesNo gloves. .....yeah right

2 days ago   ·  3
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John IrishSo sad I still do.

1 day ago
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Christopher K BarnesYup!!!

2 days ago
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Michael ReganOnly to the best of my ability.

2 days ago
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Kim Keesling GuardI yell at the TV all the time

1 day ago   ·  1
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Lisa LewisCameron Lewis is this not me?

2 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Claudia Schรถttl๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚wer nicht MarMaria CzasnyrMartin RechnitzerrMaria HafnerlHelmut Radatz๐Ÿ˜‚

2 days ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Chantel SmithDeclan Gilligan or cops programmes ๐Ÿ˜‚

22 hours ago   ·  1
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Julie CriggerClaudia Mendoza dude this is me ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚

1 day ago   ·  1
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Chelsea Courtney AndersonJoel Whitehurst this is totally mr

1 day ago   ·  1
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Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Effects on the Body! ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Effects on the Body!

Nice mnemonic for the 5 layers of the SCALP!

S: Skin โ€“ thick and hair bearing; richly supplied with blood vessels.

C: Connective tissue - thin layer of fibrous tissue that lies beneath the skin. This layer contains major scalp veins that can bleed profusely.

A: The aponeurosis (or galea aponeurotica) is a fibrous sheet found over much of the vertex of the skull. It connects the frontal and occipital muscles of the cranium.

L: Loose alveolar connective tissue - is a thin layer of tissue that accounts for the mobility of the scalp on the underlying skull.

P: Periosteum โ€“ a dense fibrous membrane that covers the surface of the skull.
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2 days ago

Nice mnemonic for the 5 layers of the SCALP! 

S: Skin โ€“ thick and hair bearing; richly supplied with blood vessels.

C: Connective tissue - thin layer of fibrous tissue that lies beneath the skin. This layer contains major scalp veins that can bleed profusely.

A: The aponeurosis (or galea aponeurotica) is a fibrous sheet found over much of the vertex of the skull. It connects the frontal and occipital muscles of the cranium.

L: Loose alveolar connective tissue - is a thin layer of tissue that accounts for the mobility of the scalp on the underlying skull.

P: Periosteum โ€“ a dense fibrous membrane that covers the surface of the skull.

Dialysis patients are chronically acidotic and hyperkalemic - pH and Serum Potassium have an inverse relationship: if pH goes down, K+ goes up! For every 0.1 change in pH, K+ changes 0.6mEq! ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

Dialysis patients are chronically acidotic and hyperkalemic - pH and Serum Potassium have an inverse relationship: if pH goes down, K+ goes up! For every 0.1 change in pH, K+ changes 0.6mEq!

David Zarate, David Long and 23 others like this

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Leslie W Brock JrProbably one of the most dangerous Patient to deal with

2 days ago
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Cory WhyteAnyone recommend a textbook for thing information? I'd like to do some pre study

1 day ago
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3 days ago

Amanda Kane, Lizzie Knowles and 23 others like this

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Christie MercerCute

3 days ago   ·  2
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Kimalee Carpenter-Brambila๐Ÿ˜ผ

3 days ago   ·  1
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Flordelisa PascualOur cat Rocky used to do that when he was alive. Purring while doing it. Such a cute PARAPUSA.

2 days ago
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Mahalia CastellYou do realise they're mating right ?

2 days ago
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Dawn Rodriguez Perrin

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Jack BeresfordMegan Lawrence

3 days ago   ·  1
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Evander YanitoAlexis

3 days ago   ·  1
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Croup
Croup is signified by a barking, dry cough, mostly in children under 5. It comes in two flavors: spasmodic and viral. Spasmodic croup is generally kids from 6 months to 3 years that are afebrile with audible stridor, a hoarse cry, and no prolific drooling. Viral croup is the same except your new baby seal might have a fever. Prehospital treatment of croup is the same as epiglottitis: Make sure they have sufficient oxygenation and tidal volume, use blow by oxygen, and donโ€™t mess with them too much. Now you can go in and look like a badass by being able to tell them WHAT KIND of croup you suspect!
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3 days ago

Croup
Croup is signified by a barking, dry cough, mostly in children under 5. It comes in two flavors: spasmodic and viral. Spasmodic croup is generally kids from 6 months to 3 years that are afebrile with audible stridor, a hoarse cry, and no prolific drooling. Viral croup is the same except your new baby seal might have a fever. Prehospital treatment of croup is the same as epiglottitis: Make sure they have sufficient oxygenation and tidal volume, use blow by oxygen, and donโ€™t mess with them too much. Now you can go in and look like a badass by being able to tell them WHAT KIND of croup you suspect!

You arrive on the scene of an MVC. Your patient is a 8-month-pregnant 24 year old female. Fire is on scene and estimate that your patient has lost approximately 2L of blood. They have controlled the bleeding. Assessment reveals that your patient is normotensive with a heart rate of 95. Her skin is pink, warm, and dry and respirations are 18 and nonlabored. What is the best explanation of why this patient has lost so much blood and yet is not showing signs of hypovolemic shock?

A) Her heart rate is tachycardic, and compensating for the lack of volume
B) Maternal blood volume is much greater than a normal person's, they can tolerate up to 30-35% loss in volume without signs of hypovolemia
C) Increased oxygen delivery from the fetus prevents hypoperfusion
D) Increased intrapleural pressure accomplishes perfusion at an accelerated rate during pregnancy

EMTs and Paramedic Students!
Getting near test time, or getting ahead for next year?
Right now you can get 3 months for the price of 2!
Try our 90 day special! Follow the prescribed study methods and have all of the knowledge and mental tips required to destroy the NREMT! Pass on your FIRST TRY - GUARANTEED!
MedicTests.com/join
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3 days ago

Amber Reiter, Sam Bowden and 23 others like this

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Neesha MahaseB ... there is an increase volume of blood during pregnancy...

3 days ago   ·  1
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Alyssa Scheuerman๐Ÿ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ

3 days ago   ·  5
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Cheryl MongesB!!!

3 days ago   ·  1
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Ashley YarbroughB

3 days ago   ·  1
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Ashley CurtisB

3 days ago   ·  1
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Desirae JellisB

3 days ago   ·  1
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Rae YoungB

3 days ago   ·  1
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Debbie ArcherB

3 days ago   ·  1
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Michelle Napierb

3 days ago   ·  1
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Sandy Jones-McKnightB

3 days ago   ·  1
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Kellie PetersonB

3 days ago   ·  1
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Kim HeissB

3 days ago   ·  1
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Alex AndraBoy

3 days ago   ·  1
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Dawn Rodriguez Perrin๐Ÿ

3 days ago   ·  1
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Mary VanceB

3 days ago   ·  1
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Jenn LoyerB

3 days ago   ·  1
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Rachel HarrellB

3 days ago   ·  1
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Karen WhittecarB

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Jeff BelcherB

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Edward TylerB

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Skills Review: Starting an EJ

1.Place the patient supine and head down if possible.

2.Turn the patientโ€™s head away from you, on the side of the neck you intend to use; as long as the patient has no suspected C-spine trauma.

3.Prep with alcohol prep

4.Tourniquet the vein lightly with one finger just above the clavicle; this might help distend the vein for a better view and puncture. Remember that blood is flowing from the head into the chest in the external jugular.

5.Cannulate the EJ by holding the needle over the patientโ€™s lower jaw vicinity and aiming toward the same side shoulder. In other words; stick the vein from the medial side instead of trying to go in right on top of it.

6.Maintain a tourniquet effect with a finger to prevent air from entering the vein until you can attach an INT hub.

7. Flush with a saline flush or attach an IV

8. Tape and secure as usual with a Tegaderm
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4 days ago

Skills Review: Starting an EJ

1.Place the patient supine and head down if possible.

2.Turn the patientโ€™s head away from you, on the side of the neck you intend to use; as long as the patient has no suspected C-spine trauma.

3.Prep with alcohol prep

4.Tourniquet the vein lightly with one finger just above the clavicle; this might help distend the vein for a better view and puncture. Remember that blood is flowing from the head into the chest in the external jugular.

5.Cannulate the EJ by holding the needle over the patientโ€™s lower jaw vicinity and aiming toward the same side shoulder. In other words; stick the vein from the medial side instead of trying to go in right on top of it.

6.Maintain a tourniquet effect with a finger to prevent air from entering the vein until you can attach an INT hub.

7. Flush with a saline flush or attach an IV

8. Tape and secure as usual with a Tegaderm

ู‡ุงุฏูŠ ุงู„ุฒุบูˆู„, Michael Sherry and 23 others like this

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Dani Clair Davis-BarnesAs a RN I should be able to do this in the ER!

4 days ago   ·  6

4 Replies

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Heather WilsonYowsa.

3 days ago   ·  1
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Avery BrownNatalie Bowman I signed u up to teach this class. ๐Ÿ˜‰๐Ÿ˜‰

4 days ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Brian ButlerWe can do this as combat medics.

3 days ago   ·  2
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Wesley FlemingDid this so many times

3 days ago   ·  3
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David Blazak^^^^^^^^^^Juggin Thug

3 days ago   ·  1
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Bill EstrellaKEY. "...stick the vein from medial side"...NOT..."...right on top of it". At all cost avoid air entering๐Ÿ˜ฑ I/O is MUCH safer and I've never missed one๐Ÿ˜‰

3 days ago   ·  1
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Derek RatzelWe do these when necessary. I find it interesting that an RN cannot

3 days ago

3 Replies

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Justin LemaThis is a great Paramedic level skill. I'de rather establish an EJ over an IO. And, nope, definitely not a RN skill

3 days ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Daniel DuystersPracticed theae yesterday in pm class, my neck is still sore

3 days ago
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Eva Mc ClintockI remember doing this as a Paramedic but could not as an RN until I got special certification. wow memories...........

3 days ago
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Vladimir Kosak

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Carmelo El Cura QuinonesEasy when you got no options or IO.

3 days ago   ·  1
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Tiffany Lashea

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Tiffany Lashea

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Tiffany Lashea

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Dai Dong Vonormal

3 days ago
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Kayli DavisonTara Beard Parsons, 8 easy steps. I got this!!

3 days ago
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Brian HudsonDid one in twenty years of being a medic.

2 days ago
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Magaly BerumenValeria Estrada no quiero eso nunca

3 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Dav Idื—ื™ื™ื‘ ืœื ืกื•ืช ืคืขื Yarden Dahari

3 days ago
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Simon NichollsSarah Edgeworth see. Easy ๐Ÿ˜

4 days ago   ·  1

6 Replies

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Tyson BenedettiSaira Marvel remember?

3 days ago   ·  1
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Cody CookePaul Nowell

3 days ago   ·  1
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4 days ago

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Gemma WilliamsJames Ewart This is how you feel when everyone else is driving ๐Ÿ˜‚

4 days ago   ·  1
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Jim AlsobrookOh god the dents in the floorboard i made

4 days ago   ·  1
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Claire CrosbieHaha Mike ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚ keeps you on your toes though eh

4 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Rachael HemphillThe lights The lights! Where are the lights?!!! Hahahha!

3 days ago   ·  2
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Madison PittmanKyle Wilson Is this how you're gonna feel when I drive this weekend? ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿš‘๐Ÿ’จ

3 days ago
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Eric HansonJulie Tschirren. This was us when Jackson drove. Jim Jim Skinner

3 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Cody McCarthyMarco Alfaro.....or every time I drive ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚

3 days ago
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Caitlin TowsleyDave Towsley

4 days ago   ·  1
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Christina WalkerDevan Walker ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚

3 days ago

1 Reply

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Mike TaylorClaire Crosbie ๐Ÿ˜‚

4 days ago   ·  1
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Noe Garcia CortesLuis Aguilar

4 days ago   ·  1
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Hemophilia, Hemophilia A, or Factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency
Hemophilia is an inherited disorder that is caused by missing or defective factor VIII, a clotting protein. This missing protein causes the patient to experience greater than normal blood loss from simple or minor injuries. This disorder may also cause bleeding into the joints, internal bleeding, and sometime bleeding into the brain.
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4 days ago

Hemophilia, Hemophilia A, or Factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency
Hemophilia is an inherited disorder that is caused by missing or defective factor VIII, a clotting protein. This missing protein causes the patient to experience greater than normal blood loss from simple or minor injuries. This disorder may also cause bleeding into the joints, internal bleeding, and sometime bleeding into the brain.

You are treating a 25-year-old female whose arm has been pinned underneath a car for more than 30 minutes. You know that when the patient is freed, circulatory collapse could occur. Which of the following best describes the elements that will be released into the patientโ€™s general circulation system to cause this condition?

A) Lactose acid, potassium, and cells
B) Lactic acid, potassium, and myoglobin
C) Lactic acid, CO2, and hemoglobin
D) Carbonic acid, potassium, and estrogen

EMTs and Paramedic Students!
Getting near test time, or getting ahead for next year?
Right now you can get 3 months for the price of 2!
Try our 90 day special! Follow the prescribed study methods and have all of the knowledge and mental tips required to destroy the NREMT! Pass on your FIRST TRY - GUARANTEED!
medictests.com/join
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5 days ago

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Alex Howdy Paulnot a medic here... but Im gunna go with lactic acid from the anerobic metabolism due to the lack of blood flow to the extremity, potassium and myoglobin from muscle tissue breakdown.... B.... makes the most sense to me using what I learned getting my bachelors

5 days ago   ·  4
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Vijayalal VijayanLactic acidosis, hyperkalemia, rhabdomyolysis. Start IV fluid preferably NS. Calcium gluconate, sodium bicarbonate, albuterol. May be tourniquet also applied, rapid transport

4 days ago   ·  1
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Jennifer McLymondBasic here.... had an ALS coworker with a similar call once and he applied a tourniquet before the limb was freed. Thoughts?

4 days ago
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Abraham ThomasB ,type of crush injury,will develop potassium,will affect kidney,muscle break down rabdo,thats myoglobin

4 days ago
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Lieta KGB.. Lactic acid frm anaerobic circ. K+ frm cellular destruction Myoglobon frm tissue breakdon.. rhabdomyolisis

4 days ago
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Alyssa Scheuerman๐Ÿ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ

5 days ago   ·  2
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Tracy Anderson WhiteCrush

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Anthony OlsenAnswer b

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Mike GrazianoIt's b

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David MagnerB

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Cheryl MongesB

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Sharon OelsenB

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Ashley YarbroughB

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Tiffany EtheridgeB

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Cody SmithB

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Adam VaughanB

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How to recognize junctional rhythms! ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

How to recognize junctional rhythms!

MedicTests.com added a new photo. ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Mathew Karry, Tim Thomson and 23 others like this

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Michelle Napierso true

5 days ago   ·  1
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Emma DysonFran Nicholls saw this and thought of you ๐Ÿ˜˜ xxx

5 days ago   ·  2

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Matti SowryY E S ! ! ! Beth Richards Marker ๐Ÿ’™

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Christoph SchererMaa Riie ๐Ÿ˜œ๐Ÿ‘

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Dominique GagnonBruno Tremblay badass everyday ๐Ÿ˜Ž haha

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Michael O'NeillPhillip Jacob Rodriguez this might be us.

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Huntington's disease is a hereditary, neuromuscular disorder that causes the gradual degeneration of nerve cells in the brain. It is characterized by progressive chorea (involuntary, rapid, jerky motions), mental deterioration, and psychiatric disorders. First symptoms typically appear in the 30s or 40s and progress until death. ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Huntingtons disease is a hereditary, neuromuscular disorder that causes the gradual degeneration of nerve cells in the brain. It is characterized by progressive chorea (involuntary, rapid, jerky motions), mental deterioration, and psychiatric disorders. First symptoms typically appear in the 30s or 40s and progress until death.

You are assessing a patient that is possibly experiencing diabetic ketoacidosis or another metabolic acidotic state. The patient presents with an abnormally deep, very rapid, sighing respiratory pattern. What is this type respiratory pattern?

A) Cheyne-Stokes respirations
B) Ataxic respirations
C) Biot respirations
D) Kussmaul respirations

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5 days ago

Lieta KG, Debbie A. Heissler Sheppard and 23 others like this

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Jo R Dan

Attachment5 days ago   ·  17

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Vijayalal VijayanKussmault's respiration-Deep and labored respiration in metabolic acidosis(DKA in type 1 DM) in an effort to get rid of excess acid and also seen in kidney disease

5 days ago
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Unnikrishnan BabuD

5 days ago   ·  1
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Chris HolguinD for the win

5 days ago   ·  1
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Jay JohnstonDelta.

5 days ago
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Joel Parks JrDelta

5 days ago
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Tee Vangkussmaul respirations.

5 days ago
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Mechelle D. CodyShe got the D

5 days ago
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Lieta KGKussmaul

4 days ago
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Eileen Carrolld

5 days ago
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Ashley CurtisD

5 days ago
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Ronnie BalkaranKussmaul

5 days ago
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Cheryl MongesD

5 days ago
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Chris Timbrookkussmaul

4 days ago
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Neesha MahaseD kussmaul respiration

5 days ago
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Christie MercerD

5 days ago
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Desirae JellisD

5 days ago
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Ashley YarbroughD

5 days ago
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Erin RednourD

5 days ago
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Jamie LeeDelta sir! Kussmaul respirations

5 days ago
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John NogueiraD

5 days ago
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