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Attack angles for intramuscular, subcutaneous, and intradermal injections! ... See MoreSee Less

2 hours ago

Attack angles for intramuscular, subcutaneous, and intradermal injections!

Traumatic Asphyxia
This is a term used to describe a severe crushing injury to the chest and/or abdomen. It results from an increase in intrathoracic pressure. This pressure increase forces blood from the right side of the heart into the veins of the upper thorax, neck, and face.
Signs and Symptoms include:
- Redish purple discoloration of the face and neck
- JVD
- Swelling or hemorrhage of the conjunctiva (petechiae may appear)
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23 hours ago

Traumatic Asphyxia 
This is a term used to describe a severe crushing injury to the chest and/or abdomen. It results from an increase in intrathoracic pressure. This pressure increase forces blood from the right side of the heart into the veins of the upper thorax, neck, and face.
Signs and Symptoms include: 
- Redish purple discoloration of the face and neck
- JVD
- Swelling or hemorrhage of the conjunctiva (petechiae may appear)

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Whats the out of hospital emergency teatment ?

6 hours ago
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Cardioversion!
Cardioversion is used for patients in an irregular rhythm, such a atrial fibrillation or v-tach with a pulse. An important thing to remember in cardioversion is that the shock is synchronized to the R wave. Shocking during the absolute refractory period (T-wave) will likely create asystole. Make sure sync button is on and you see R-wave capture. This is usually represented by a little dot or arrow at the top of the R-wave on the monitor.
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1 day ago

Cardioversion!
Cardioversion is used for patients in an irregular rhythm, such a atrial fibrillation or v-tach with a pulse. An important thing to remember in cardioversion is that the shock is synchronized to the R wave. Shocking during the absolute refractory period (T-wave) will likely create asystole. Make sure sync button is on and you see R-wave capture. This is usually represented by a little dot or arrow at the top of the R-wave on the monitor.

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So it’s not an irregular rhythm....it’s a symptomatic Tachy-arrhythmia not responsive to other treatments. What about AVRT, AVRNT, SVT’s? When would V-Tach with a pulse be irregular? Cardioversion is also recommended for the treatment of the following : Supraventricular tachycardia due to reentry Atrial fibrillation Atrial flutter Atrial tachycardia Monomorphic VT with pulses Some of the information you give is either incomplete or incorrect based on changes to ACLS recommendations

15 hours ago   ·  1
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Joshua Little

21 hours ago
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1 day ago

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my face everyday I go to work and the stupid thing is I don't even know what's stressful 😂

1 day ago

2 Replies

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Kenny Nelson 2 years baby face

21 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Sarah Morrison lol how I feel and look post nights 😂😂😂😂😂

1 day ago   ·  1

4 Replies

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Elizabeth...andddd, this is me. 😂😂😂

1 day ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Em Rose this could be you at 35 😂

1 day ago

1 Reply

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Sarah K. Rose Marquez

1 day ago
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Rachel Nolan

12 hours ago
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Antonio Silva what a certain company has done to you lol

1 day ago   ·  1
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MW Williams Dave Towsley how old is mike emigh?

1 day ago   ·  1
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Peter Wexny 😂😂😂

8 hours ago   ·  1

3 Replies

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Roy Ortega

1 day ago   ·  1
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Massanti Rasmussen Geisler illinuna?

14 hours ago

1 Reply

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Kassandra Rose Bastian

1 day ago
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Mike Gultnieks 🤣🤣

1 day ago

10 Replies

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Joey Borrego

22 hours ago
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Geoff Cooper

19 hours ago   ·  1
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Zac Schroeder

1 day ago   ·  1
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George Ruff Olique Lockhart Richard Boateng Bryan Peña

1 day ago

2 Replies

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Joe Bilotto

1 day ago
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Tabitha Davis Forrester

1 day ago
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Joshua Little

1 day ago
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Nikki Robison

1 day ago
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Geoff Roberts

13 hours ago
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James DeGroff

3 hours ago
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Brian Peterson

1 day ago

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Rapid Trauma Assessment Quick Reference! ... See MoreSee Less

1 day ago

Rapid Trauma Assessment Quick Reference!

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Qamarul Arifin nie kau nie

11 hours ago

1 Reply

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Makayla Rowland Jennifer Moore 😉👌

1 day ago   ·  1
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Tino Drish-Young II

1 day ago   ·  1
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Chance Fishpaw

7 hours ago
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Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF)
The cerebrospinal fluid aids in the protection of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges by acting as a watery cushion surrounding them to absorb the shocks to which they are exposed.

If you suspect a skull fracture and there is evidence of bleeding from the nose or ears (any bleeding from the skull when a fracture is suspected) you can sometimes determine the presence of CSF in the blood with a Halo Test:
If possible - take a drop of the suspected blood and let it drip onto a sheet, paper towel or filter paper (coffee filters work great in a pinch).
- Watch the drop of blood for signs of the CSF leaving the denser blood and producing the tell-tale Halo sign. You will see a distinct lighter ring around the coagulating blood drop, suggesting a skull fracture and determining your patient to be a definite Load-N-Go!
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2 days ago

Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) 
The cerebrospinal fluid aids in the protection of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges by acting as a watery cushion surrounding them to absorb the shocks to which they are exposed.

If you suspect a skull fracture and there is evidence of bleeding from the nose or ears (any bleeding from the skull when a fracture is suspected) you can sometimes determine the presence of CSF in the blood with a Halo Test:
If possible - take a drop of the suspected blood and let it drip onto a sheet, paper towel or filter paper (coffee filters work great in a pinch). 
- Watch the drop of blood for signs of the CSF leaving the denser blood and producing the tell-tale Halo sign. You will see a distinct lighter ring around the coagulating blood drop, suggesting a skull fracture and determining your patient to be a definite Load-N-Go!

You are called to a local industrial center for a 23-year-old man with facial burns. The foreperson informs you that the patient was working on a gas-powered generator when the equipment flashed. On arrival, the fire is out and the patient is in the restroom, washing his face. You note that this patient has sustained serious inhalation burns of the upper airway. Which would be the most appropriate therapy?

a) High-concentration of oxygen, intubation, and bronchoconstrictors
b) Insertion of a laryngeal mask airway (LMA)
c) High-concentration of oxygen, intubation, bronchodilators
d) Low-concentration of humidified oxygen

MedicTests - NREMT Test Prep and EMS Education Online. Compete against your friends! Unlock Achievements! THOUSANDS of test questions and an entire library of study material awaits! Pass on the First Try -- Guaranteed!
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2 days ago

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C - without a doubt, and any paramedic worth their salt knows this.

1 day ago
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D, prepare to cric

2 days ago   ·  1
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Dee...upper airway burns...high con O2 would dry out burnt airway. Nebulize dat shit.

2 days ago
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Being a cert IV volunteer AO, O2 on 15L/ min and then ventolin neb, paras wouldn't be far behind.

2 days ago
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Unless you can RSI, D is the only acceptable answer.

2 days ago
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C he needs Intubated very quickly and bronchiodilators to keep his alveoli open

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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D for definite.

2 days ago
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D, but be prepared.

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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Defintely D.

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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C

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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C

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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D

2 days ago
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MedicTests.com added 2 new photos.

Grey-Turner’s Sign and Cullen’s Sign
Signs of Internal Bleeding are easy to find but, it can be harder to determine to the source of the bleed.

Grey-Turner’s sign and Cullen’s sign can be easily confused with one another because they are both characterized by the same physical findings in different locations.

Grey-Turner’s sign is located on the flanks.
Cullen’s sign is located around the umbilicus (periumbilical).

These signs can be seen when bleeding occurs inside the abdomen or in the retroperitoneal location. This is most commonly thought to be due to necrotizing pancreatitis, but it can also happen in other conditions such as an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and Ectopic Pregnancy.

The mnemonic for remembering how to distinguish between these signs:
Grey-TURNer’s sign is located when you TURN towards your flank and
CUllen’s sign is located around the Umbilicus.
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2 days ago

Grey-Turner’s Sign and Cullen’s Sign 
Signs of Internal Bleeding are easy to find but, it can be harder to determine to the source of the bleed.

Grey-Turner’s sign and Cullen’s sign can be easily confused with one another because they are both characterized by the same physical findings in different locations.

Grey-Turner’s sign is located on the flanks.
Cullen’s sign is located around the umbilicus (periumbilical).

These signs can be seen when bleeding occurs inside the abdomen or in the retroperitoneal location. This is most commonly thought to be due to necrotizing pancreatitis, but it can also happen in other conditions such as an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and Ectopic Pregnancy.

The mnemonic for remembering how to distinguish between these signs:
Grey-TURNer’s sign is located when you TURN towards your flank and
CUllen’s sign is located around the Umbilicus.

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Another way to remember.....Grey Turner -- Two names, two flanks....Cullens -- One name, one umbilicus

2 days ago   ·  33

3 Replies

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Great to know,,, but... is it going to change the way we treat? or transport?

1 day ago
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Sasha..... what I was telling u about the other day x

2 days ago   ·  1
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Caleb Volmer, our 111 call lol

2 days ago   ·  1
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2 days ago

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I tell them it’s my first day and I need the practice

2 days ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Lol unless your me and still sketchy on my IV skills

2 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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What did you say? Im done already.

2 days ago   ·  5
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Jeremy Munn this is u lol

2 days ago

1 Reply

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Alex Arocho, Sonya Edwards it's us the champions 😂

2 days ago

3 Replies

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And then they fucking move when I get a flash back and blow the vein and I glare at them like why!?!?!?!?!

2 days ago   ·  2
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Muriah Deanyou! Hahaha

2 days ago

1 Reply

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Hui everytime

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Yep. *reaches into pocket and grabs a 16 or 18 ga*

2 days ago   ·  1
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Nadeen Aynin, all the time sa matitigas na ulo hihi

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Drew #goals

2 days ago   ·  1
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2 days ago
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Oh ya!

2 days ago
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Nathan Lapp Kasey Woods me lol

2 days ago   ·  2
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Hi-fives all round when you get it🤩

14 hours ago
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No. Such. Thing. I. Got. This

2 days ago
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That would be my husband 😊

2 days ago
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Chris Collard this is gonna be my new found confidence

2 days ago   ·  1
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Put me in coach! Lol BreAnn Alkhatib Chris Turner

2 days ago
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Marcus McGriff...every single time

22 hours ago   ·  1
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Yep!

2 days ago
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Joe Bailey watch me 💁🏼

2 days ago   ·  1
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I am!!!

1 day ago
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Gilbert Trujillo my vein whisperer

2 days ago
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Susana piece of cake

1 day ago
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A quick method of estimating the date of a pregnancy is by measuring fundal height. This is the distance from the symphysis pubis to the top of the uterine fundus. The fundus is measured by running a measuring tape vertically from the top of the pubis bone to the top of the fundus. Each centimeter of fundal height is considered equal to one week of gestation. For example, if the patient measures 20 cm, she would be approximately 20 weeks gestation. ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

A quick method of estimating the date of a pregnancy is by measuring fundal height. This is the distance from the symphysis pubis to the top of the uterine fundus. The fundus is measured by running a measuring tape vertically from the top of the pubis bone to the top of the fundus. Each centimeter of fundal height is considered equal to one week of gestation. For example, if the patient measures 20 cm, she would be approximately 20 weeks gestation.

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Kami Biorkman

3 days ago   ·  1
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You and your partner made an unsuccessful attempt to resuscitate a 65-year-old female that was in cardiac arrest. The family sues your EMS organization for negligence. You and your partner will have to prove that your actions during the resuscitation:

a) exceeded the standards set forth by the AHA
b) were extraordinary and heroic
c) were similar to the actions a reasonably prudent person would do under similar circumstances
d) were not within their duty to act

EMTs and Paramedic Students!
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3 days ago

You and your partner made an unsuccessful attempt to resuscitate a 65-year-old female that was in cardiac arrest. The family sues your EMS organization for negligence. You and your partner will have to prove that your actions during the resuscitation:

a) exceeded the standards set forth by the AHA
b) were extraordinary and heroic
c) were similar to the actions a reasonably prudent person would do under similar circumstances
d) were not within their duty to act

EMTs and Paramedic Students!
Getting near test time, or getting ahead for next year?
Right now you can get 3 months for the price of 2!
Try our 90 day special! Have all of the knowledge and mental tips required to destroy the NREMT! Pass on your FIRST TRY - GUARANTEED!

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C

2 days ago
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C, just do what you gave been trained to do.

3 days ago   ·  1
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C

2 days ago   ·  1
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C

3 days ago   ·  1
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C

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C

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C

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C

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C

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C

3 days ago   ·  1
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C

3 days ago   ·  1
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C

3 days ago   ·  1
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C it is.

3 days ago   ·  1
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C

3 days ago   ·  1
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C

3 days ago   ·  1
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C

3 days ago   ·  1
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C

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C

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C

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C

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C

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C

3 days ago   ·  1
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C

3 days ago   ·  1
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C

3 days ago   ·  1
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C

3 days ago   ·  1
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Quick Reference: Premature Contractions ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

Quick Reference: Premature Contractions

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Teri-Lynn Parrell

3 days ago   ·  2
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Drew

3 days ago   ·  2
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Calla Tetreault

3 days ago   ·  1
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Typo in PJC text, should be Premature Junctional Contraction...

1 day ago   ·  1
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3 days ago

We all appreciate a good sharer!

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Juan Padilla

3 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Jessica Behrends

3 days ago   ·  1
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Kay Stu

3 days ago   ·  1
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Effects of the Sympathetic and Parasympathetic on the body! ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

Effects of the Sympathetic and Parasympathetic on the body!

Diverticulitis is the inflammation (often due to infection) of diverticula--small, bulging pouches that can form in the lining of the digestive system. It is most often found in the lower part of large intestine.

Signs and Symptoms include:
LLQ (left lower quadrant) abdominal pain
Pain often constant and persisting for several days with nausea and vomiting
Fever
Abdominal tenderness
Constipation
Diarrhea
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4 days ago

Diverticulitis is the inflammation (often due to infection) of diverticula--small, bulging pouches that can form in the lining of the digestive system. It is most often found in the lower part of large intestine.

Signs and Symptoms include: 
LLQ (left lower quadrant) abdominal pain
Pain often constant and persisting for several days with nausea and vomiting
Fever
Abdominal tenderness
Constipation
Diarrhea

You arrive on scene to find a 7-year-old male patient with an arrow from an archery set imbedded approximately 1.5 inches into his right eye.
What is the best way to manage this patient?

Getting near test time, or getting ahead for next year?
Right now you can get 3 months for the price of 2!
Try our 90 day special NOW! MedicTests.comGetting near test time, or getting ahead for next year?
Right now you can get 3 months for the price of 2!
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... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

You arrive on scene to find a 7-year-old male patient with an arrow from an archery set imbedded approximately 1.5 inches into his right eye. 
What is the best way to manage this patient? 

Getting near test time, or getting ahead for next year? 
Right now you can get 3 months for the price of 2! 
Try our 90 day special NOW! http://MedicTests.comGetting near test time, or getting ahead for next year?
Right now you can get 3 months for the price of 2! 
Try our 90 day special NOW! http://MedicTests.com

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I'd imagine stabilize it as much as possible, check for pupil dilation in the other eye, manage the pain and transport? Would anybody care to enlighten me?

4 days ago   ·  1

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Check pupil in unaffected eye then secure arrow and cover both eyes. Pain and anxiety management as needed.

4 days ago

2 Replies

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Put another apple on his head and try again. But seriously, stabilise the arrow, cover both eyes, spinal immobilisation, pain management and transport to nearest paediatric trauma centre.

15 hours ago
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Cover good eye. Immobilise arrow. Child won't be able to see so keeping mammy or daddy beside him is vital to his comfort.

3 days ago
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Same plus eyepatch or pad to cover good eye, remember eyes my synchronously. Treat for shock. Appropriate analgesia if required

4 days ago   ·  1
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That is an impaled object.protect the other eye. cover it to protect the muscle so that it's could relaxed.do not try to removed it.badage the inmpale object and transport the patient to hospital

4 days ago
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Jared lol Stabilize the arrow. Cover the other eye so patient doesn’t try look around and have the other eye move too. Treat for shock. Check pupil resource of other eye. 18g IV, fluids, transport, pain management.

4 days ago   ·  1
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Stabilize , cover both eyes, IV, monitor and perhaps something to help calm him, treat pain.. Flight to a Childrens center if transport to one is long..

4 days ago
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Stabilize and immediate transport making sure to cover the other eye also

3 days ago
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Stabilize the arrow, cover another eye, do shock management, bring him to hospital. Carry him with stretcher or carrying chair rather than let him walk.

4 days ago
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Stabilize with rolled gauze wrapped around the base by the eye. Cover other eye so that patient doesn't look around. Treat for shock

4 days ago
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Stabilize with a styrofoam or paper cup

4 days ago
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As above, transport flat to save viscous fluid

4 days ago
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Thinkbabout it....

3 days ago
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Stabilize the arrow. Cover other eye and transport.

4 days ago
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Attachment3 days ago
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Cut it then cup it

4 days ago
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Quick Reference Review: Hypertonic Hypotonic Isotonic IV Solution ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

Quick Reference Review:  Hypertonic Hypotonic Isotonic IV Solution

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Remember that even Isotonic only stays in the system for relatively short of time, it will eventually be absorbed after about 1.5 hours. Also D5W in theory an isotonic, but once body metabolized the dextrose, it will turned into pure water thus hypotonic.

4 days ago   ·  1

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HypO = cell is swelling O <- swollen cell

4 days ago
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Nick Woolever know this!!!!!

4 days ago
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Rebeca Hurtado

4 days ago   ·  1
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Calla Tetreault

4 days ago

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Courtney Champley

4 days ago

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Nephrolithiasis (Kidney Stones)
Kidney stones are clumps of crystals that form in the kidneys. They may be as small as a grain of sand or, in rare instances, become as large as a golf ball. Kidney stones can be caused by infection, problems with metabolism of minerals, dehydration, or urinary stasis, which occurs when the bladder is not emptied completely. The symptoms of kidney stones are classic and intense.

Pain is the primary symptom of kidney stones that patients present to EMS with. A kidney stone travels from the kidney where it formed down the tubes called ureters, which drain the kidney into the bladder. As a kidney stone passes through a ureter, patients typically feel flank pain. Flank pain is described as pain over the lower back, starting below the rib cage, and extending down to the top of the hip.
The pain is often described as colicky and spastic, coming in waves.

Transport to the hospital is mainly supportive with perhaps O2 via NC, EKG (just in case), Saline lock and perhaps obtain dr orders for pain relief meds and possibly Zofran for N/V if present.
... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Nephrolithiasis (Kidney Stones)
Kidney stones are clumps of crystals that form in the kidneys. They may be as small as a grain of sand or, in rare instances, become as large as a golf ball. Kidney stones can be caused by infection, problems with metabolism of minerals, dehydration, or urinary stasis, which occurs when the bladder is not emptied completely. The symptoms of kidney stones are classic and intense.

Pain is the primary symptom of kidney stones that patients present to EMS with. A kidney stone travels from the kidney where it formed down the tubes called ureters, which drain the kidney into the bladder. As a kidney stone passes through a ureter, patients typically feel flank pain. Flank pain is described as pain over the lower back, starting below the rib cage, and extending down to the top of the hip. 
The pain is often described as colicky and spastic, coming in waves.

Transport to the hospital is mainly supportive with perhaps O2 via NC, EKG (just in case), Saline lock and perhaps obtain dr orders for pain relief meds and possibly Zofran for N/V if present.

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It is fun to watch the " kidney stone dance".

4 days ago
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You are assessing GCS score in a 90 year old trauma patient. Your patient's eyes open in response to speech, but he is nonverbal, and only appears to make localizing, purposeful movement towards painful stimuli. What's your best estimate of this patient's GCS score?

a) 13
b) 7
c) 9
d) 11

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5 days ago

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3+1+5=9

5 days ago   ·  2
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C

5 days ago   ·  1
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9

5 days ago   ·  1
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C

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C

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C

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C-9

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C

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9

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9

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C

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C

3 days ago
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C

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9

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9

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C

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C-9

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C

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C - 9 points

5 days ago   ·  1
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9

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C

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C

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C

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C

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C

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Quick Reference: Heart Valves ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Quick Reference: Heart Valves

Your first call as an EMT! ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Your first call as an EMT!

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I was recently dispatched to a BLS transport company unit requesting ALS intercept for impending respiratory arrest. Apparently none of their company's medics were available When I got there, one of the EMTs had three months on the job, the other was on his first shift that wasn't training or riding as a third. I jumped on their bus. The guy was serious but not as bad as they thought. They had done everything right and were super excited to help me as I hooked him up to the monitor, put a line in etc. The "senior" EMT told the first day guy to drive. He hit the lights and sirens and we went, my partner following in our bus. We get to the ER and the kid driving is so excited he leaves for the siren blaring as we back in the ER bay, then jumps out and opens the back door, sirens still screaming. My partner gets out of our bus, walks over and shuts it off. Kid grabs the head of the stretcher, so excited about his first emergency triage. Until the triage PA yelled "Are you the idiot that made us all deaf with that f'ing siren"?! Poor kid looked like he was gonna cry. I felt terrible for him, but had to laugh remembering when I was just like him. When we were done my partner and I had them follow us to Dunkin' and bought them some "Welcome to EMS" coffee and donuts.

5 days ago   ·  4

1 Reply

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You rock👍

3 days ago
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Kayla Stannard why is this us lol

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Olivier Desilets💪 good job body !

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Nick Nick D. Raver Scott Selko Lyle Havelka Lee Daniels I believe according to you guys mine was the opposite. And I had to drive his wife to the hospital in her car! I'll never forget my 1st call

5 days ago   ·  2

4 Replies

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Mine was yesterday, haha

5 days ago   ·  1
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Tania Morris this is how I feel on the inside every time I get a pt to hospital still breathing. Lol

5 days ago   ·  2

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Danny Jennings, this is your challenge.

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Shelby Claire Gramlich when I graduate to unrestricted 😅😅😅

5 days ago   ·  2

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Not the case with Austin Schmidt...

5 days ago

1 Reply

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This is gonna be us 😂 aim- not kill anyone Sunena Jabeen

5 days ago   ·  2

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Haha that's how I felt with my first MI, and first Trauma!!!

5 days ago   ·  1
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Paul Michael Halford goals

5 days ago
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Best day ever. lol

5 days ago   ·  1
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Rachel Nolan

5 days ago   ·  1
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Nicola Robson, Kaz Mahon Emma Spicer

5 days ago   ·  3

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Florian, rule #1, don‘t kill anyone.

5 days ago   ·  1
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Kelly Walker Merissa Brown Georgie Van Kateey Nickolas

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Hayley Marie Hansford 😂😂😂😂😂

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Bailey Bauer...me!! Lol

5 days ago
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Jill M Tucker 😂🤣🤣

5 days ago   ·  1
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Rhys Dillyoh 🙈

5 days ago   ·  1
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Nicholas Gutschick

4 days ago   ·  1

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Dave McCarthy

5 days ago   ·  1

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Brent Carr

5 days ago   ·  1

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Angina!
Angina Pectoris is simply ischemic chest pain that can be felt in various regions of the body.
Nitroglycerin is effective for the treatment of the ischemic chest pain (angina pectoris). It also has beneficial hemodynamic effects including dilation of the arterioles, veins in the periphery, and coronary arteries, which decreases preload. In turn, lowering the workload and myocardial oxygen demand of the heart muscle.
Because of it's powerful hemodynamic effects, nitroglycerin should not be used in patients with:
- Hypotension (systolic pressure < 90 mm Hg)
- Bradycardia (< 50 bpm)
- Tachycardia (> 100 bpm)
- Recent use of erectile dysfunction medication (< 24 hrs)
Nitro should be administered cautiously in patients suspected of having an inferior wall MI with possible right ventricular involvement.
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5 days ago

Angina!
Angina Pectoris is simply ischemic chest pain that can be felt in various regions of the body. 
Nitroglycerin is effective for the treatment of the ischemic chest pain (angina pectoris). It also has beneficial hemodynamic effects including dilation of the arterioles, veins in the periphery, and coronary arteries, which decreases preload. In turn, lowering the workload and myocardial oxygen demand of the heart muscle.
Because of its powerful hemodynamic effects, nitroglycerin should not be used in patients with:
- Hypotension (systolic pressure < 90 mm Hg)
- Bradycardia (< 50 bpm)
- Tachycardia (> 100 bpm)
- Recent use of erectile dysfunction medication (< 24 hrs)
Nitro should be administered cautiously in patients suspected of having an inferior wall MI with possible right ventricular involvement.

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Hypotension <90

5 days ago
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Κανένας

5 days ago   ·  1
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