MedicTests.com's EMS Educational Bites 5 Times Daily!

 

Click the box below the posts to view extended comments by users

Subcutaneous Emphysema - Air embolism in soft tissue injuries.
Pathophysiology:
Air is able to travel to the soft tissues of the neck from the mediastinum and the retroperitoneum (the space behind the abdominal cavity) because these areas are connected by fascial planes. From the punctured lungs or airways, the air travels up the perivascular sheaths and into the mediastinum, from which it can enter the subcutaneous tissues.
Spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema is thought to result from increased pressures in the lung that cause alveoli to rupture. In spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema, air travels from the ruptured alveoli into the interstitium and along the blood vessels of the lung, into the mediastinum and from there into the tissues of the neck or head.
... See MoreSee Less

13 hours ago

Subcutaneous Emphysema - Air embolism in soft tissue injuries.
Pathophysiology:
Air is able to travel to the soft tissues of the neck from the mediastinum and the retroperitoneum (the space behind the abdominal cavity) because these areas are connected by fascial planes. From the punctured lungs or airways, the air travels up the perivascular sheaths and into the mediastinum, from which it can enter the subcutaneous tissues.
Spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema is thought to result from increased pressures in the lung that cause alveoli to rupture. In spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema, air travels from the ruptured alveoli into the interstitium and along the blood vessels of the lung, into the mediastinum and from there into the tissues of the neck or head.

You and your partner have just assisted in a field delivery. Your partner tells you to take the infant and perform an APGAR assessment. An APGAR assessment should be performed:

A) at one minute and five minutes after crowning
B) at one minute and five minutes after delivery
C) at five minutes and ten minutes after delivery
D) only once after you cut the cord

MedicTests - NREMT Test Prep and EMS Education Online. Compete against your friends! Unlock Achievements! THOUSANDS of test questions and an entire library of study material awaits!
Pass on the First Try -- Guaranteed!
MedicTests.com/join
... See MoreSee Less

15 hours ago

Aliwu Mohammed, Marites Bernal and 61 others like this

View previous comments

John CondonE and a 1/2

15 hours ago   ·  1
Avatar

Nicola Hannb

13 hours ago   ·  1
Avatar

Cesiah Garcia RodriguezB easy

11 hours ago
Avatar

Wade WardE

12 hours ago   ·  1
Avatar

Heather WilsonB

15 hours ago
Avatar

Deborah JanssonB

15 hours ago
Avatar

Cheryl MongesB

14 hours ago
Avatar

Gina GreggC

14 hours ago

2 Replies

Avatar

David MagnerB

9 hours ago
Avatar

Amy Hendrix MadrieB

14 hours ago
Avatar

Christine ParisiB

15 hours ago
Avatar

Rae YoungB

14 hours ago
Avatar

Scott MoranB

15 hours ago
Avatar

Michelle Napierb

13 hours ago
Avatar

Priscilla MerloB

11 hours ago
Avatar

Siviwe MakhonjwaB

14 hours ago
Avatar

Rachel HarrellB

15 hours ago
Avatar

Chris CoombsB

13 hours ago
Avatar

Anne O'BrienB...

7 hours ago
Avatar

Amber SuszczynskiB!

15 hours ago
Avatar

John Murphy JrB

13 hours ago
Avatar

Tania MorrisB

13 hours ago
Avatar

Donna ToddB

14 hours ago
Avatar

John NogueiraB

13 hours ago
Avatar

Tina M ClarkB

14 hours ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Pediatric vs Adult Airway
Pediatric Airway Anatomy differs from the Adult Airway in the following ways that make managing the Pedi Airway challenging to say the least
•Obligate Nasal Breathers
•Large Tongue
•Large Occiput
•Larynx and Trachea are funnel shaped
•Vocal Cords slant anteriorly
•Larynx located higher in neck (at C4 vs. C6 in adults)
•Narrowest part of the pediatric airway is at cricoid cartilage (until age 5). In adults the narrowest part is at the glottis opening.
•Glottis Location Different:
•Premature Babies at C3
•Newborns C3-C4
•Adults C5
... See MoreSee Less

17 hours ago

Pediatric vs Adult Airway
Pediatric Airway Anatomy differs from the Adult Airway in the following ways that make managing the Pedi Airway challenging to say the least
•Obligate Nasal Breathers
•Large Tongue
•Large Occiput
•Larynx and Trachea are funnel shaped
•Vocal Cords slant anteriorly
•Larynx located higher in neck (at C4 vs. C6 in adults)
•Narrowest part of the pediatric airway is at cricoid cartilage (until age 5). In adults the narrowest part is at the glottis opening. 
•Glottis Location Different: 
•Premature Babies at C3
•Newborns C3-C4
•Adults C5

Masakazu Yara, Zondo Sindiswa Cndy and 75 others like this

View previous comments

Natalia MunizMartina Bacarella

9 hours ago
Avatar

Krystle NunezJoe Contino here you go

13 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Comment on Facebook

MedicTests.com added a new photo. ... See MoreSee Less

19 hours ago

Tanya Fuchs, Patrick Rubien and 343 others like this

View previous comments

Rusty AndersNo, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night....

17 hours ago   ·  5
Avatar

Klaire CarrickFran Therese when all your placements were with AT! And then you get a job and you've never touched a patient 😂😭

5 hours ago   ·  1
Avatar

Jessy ManninoRachel Zarahn you wash ya hands.... ya turn the page.....

18 hours ago   ·  1
Avatar

Jacob CampbellEmily Falch me on my field tube 😉😂

14 hours ago   ·  1
Avatar

Manny SanchezLol more like a few times in lab.

18 hours ago
Avatar

Jenna SichermanJulia Lopezz Hahahha 💁🏻

14 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Sergio Elgin AdamsEmily Chasity Caitlyn McKenzie

17 hours ago   ·  3
Avatar

Calvin WhiteAnthony White 😂

15 hours ago   ·  1
Avatar

Cathy CapassoJersey city

13 hours ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Mnemonic for 5 common diseases that cause respiratory distress.
CBABE
C=Cystic Fibrosis
B=Bronchiectasis
A=Asthma
B=Bronchitis
E=Emphysema
... See MoreSee Less

21 hours ago

IV Therapy!
Intravenous (IV) Therapy is one of the most common invasive procedures handled in the prehospital environment. Proficiency in IV therapy technique is important for most procedures required in advanced life support. The range of catheter sizes vary depending on the specific need for the patient.
... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

IV Therapy! 
Intravenous (IV) Therapy is one of the most common invasive procedures handled in the prehospital environment. Proficiency in IV therapy technique is important for most procedures required in advanced life support. The range of catheter sizes vary depending on the specific need for the patient.

You are treating a 17-year-old female who is 34-weeks-pregnant and complaining of a severe headache and blurred vision. Your initial assessment reveals a substantial amount of edema, especially in her feet and hands. She states that she has not been under the regular care of a doctor during her pregnancy. This patient is likely to be suffering from:

A) Placenta previa
B) Abruptio placenta
C) Supine-hypotensive disorder
D) Pre-eclampsia

Make studying FUN! Medictests.com - EMT and Paramedic Practice Tests Online! National Registry Test Prep! Check out our entire library of study resources and NREMT tests!
Medictests.com/join
... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

Kate Eisen, Josue Garcia del Angel and 90 others like this

View previous comments

Michael OatesFolo ? You are treating a 17yo male, who 34 weeks ago knocked up the callers daughter, this patient is most likley suffering from A) Loraina Bobbitt Syndrome, B) Cranial Rectitus Syndrome C) Scared Shit Syndrome, D) Loss of vital signs.

2 days ago   ·  7

1 Reply

Avatar

Kurt HansenD! Headache and blurred vision are two telltale signs of stupid high BP!

2 days ago   ·  5
Avatar

Ken GossShe got the D

2 days ago   ·  19
Avatar

Steve TautauCheck BP, suspect D.

1 day ago   ·  1
Avatar

Alyssa ScheuermanDuh...

1 day ago
Avatar

Priscilla MerloD! Blurred vision!!!

20 hours ago
Avatar

Eileen CarrollD

1 day ago
Avatar

Speedy Daisy Dipuo NfanyanaD

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Lauryn E. LeeD is for duh.

2 days ago
Avatar

Jo Anne GholsonD

2 days ago
Avatar

Ronnie LewisD all day

2 days ago
Avatar

Cheryl MongesD

1 day ago
Avatar

Mary VanceD

22 hours ago
Avatar

Jay JohnstonDelta

2 days ago
Avatar

Semaj Cole IglesiasD

23 hours ago
Avatar

David MagnerD

2 days ago
Avatar

Alan R. AlbieroD

2 days ago
Avatar

Rae YoungD

2 days ago
Avatar

Jaina LimaD

1 day ago
Avatar

Michaela GillottD

2 days ago
Avatar

Travis SternD!!!!

1 day ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Myocardial Contusions!
Blunt cardiac injury is most frequently caused by traffic accidents and results from a direct blow to the chest from a steering wheel or rapid deceleration. A direct blow to the precordium or a sustained force to the thoracic wall compresses the heart between the sternum and spine. In rapid deceleration accidents the heart, which has relatively free movement in the anteroposterior direction, continues to move forward due to its momentum and strikes the internal sternum with considerable force.
★Other less frequent causes are:
- Falls from a great height
- Sport injuries
- Blast forces
★Signs and Symptoms include:
- Irregular heartbeat
- Signs of a MI or ACS
- Chest pressure or discomfort
- Radiating pain
- Sortness of breath
... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

Myocardial Contusions!
Blunt cardiac injury is most frequently caused by traffic accidents and results from a direct blow to the chest from a steering wheel or rapid deceleration. A direct blow to the precordium or a sustained force to the thoracic wall compresses the heart between the sternum and spine. In rapid deceleration accidents the heart, which has relatively free movement in the anteroposterior direction, continues to move forward due to its momentum and strikes the internal sternum with considerable force. 
★Other less frequent causes are:
- Falls from a great height
- Sport injuries
- Blast forces
★Signs and Symptoms include:
- Irregular heartbeat
- Signs of a MI or ACS
- Chest pressure or discomfort
- Radiating pain
- Sortness of breath

MedicTests.com added a new photo. ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

Ryan Lengthorn, Marc Carroll and 170 others like this

View previous comments

Brandon TubbsMichael Conover, when answering calls alone at night.lol

2 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Sarah MitchellCol Hayman

1 day ago   ·  1
Avatar

Jake WareCullen Perine

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Gemma-Louise BuntonRob Moore

2 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Catherine MaherDaniel Skelly Jason Eastham Nicholas Zuber Ralph Daniel Bledsoe "objective data," YOU'RE KILLIN' ME, SMALLS but still

20 hours ago   ·  1
Avatar

Tristan MackinlayMatt Gaston *cries in medic*

1 day ago   ·  2

1 Reply

Avatar

Kenyon MartinTrina Scaife

1 day ago   ·  1
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

A couple common forms of abdominal pain! ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

A couple common forms of abdominal pain!

Josh Newsham, Marc Carroll and 112 others like this

View previous comments

Lina WallaceAimee Lynn, this is the different things I was talking about, when you mentioned your abd pain.

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

NIce video explaining the cardiac conduction system! ... See MoreSee Less

Today we're talking the heart and heart throbs -- both literal and those of the televised variety. Hank explains how your heart’s pacemaker cells...

3 days ago

Jim Hall, Ho Kamyong and 27 others like this

Comment on Facebook

You are called to the local park for 10-year-old male that was repeatedly kicked in the abdomen during a fight. An injury to which abdominal organ is most likely to cause death in a pediatric patient?

A) Liver
B) Appendix
C) Stomach
D) Spleen

MedicTests - NREMT Test Prep and EMS Education Online. Compete against your friends! Unlock Achievements! THOUSANDS of test questions and an entire library of study material awaits! Pass on the First Try -- Guaranteed! medictests.com/join
... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

Venus Washington, Debbie A. Heissler Sheppard and 106 others like this

View previous comments

Steven WilsonWhich is most likely to cause death 💀 is the question! Enlargement of the spleen after injury can take 2 days to weeks to Months to rupture. Liver injuries often heal without treatment but can require surgery. Blood vessels can sometimes be sealed up in the liver to prevent abdominal compartment syndrome. CAT is needed and surgery to see what the extent of the damage is.The Spleen is the most commonly injured organ.sometimes a less severe injury to the spleen will heal itself also. I would say the spleen.

2 days ago
Avatar

Christopher BisnettWell really depends, on which area he was kicked in. Spleen ruptures you have internal bleed, stomach can bleed out as well. Liver plays huge role.. I want to say liver, but likely spleen

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Chris CollinsDelta Not only does the spleen hold a considerable volume of blood in all ages, it is vital for immune system health in peds

3 days ago
Avatar

Heather HuntleyLiver is highly vascular as well. Is the answer spleen bc its less protected and more susceptible to injury?

3 days ago
Avatar

Shea AlyceSpleen! Hits close to home, lost mine at 14 in a Horse jumping accident, ouchy. Was lucky though and got keyhole :)

3 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Wendy DonohueD more likely in a paed but A could have a haematoma or small laceration

2 days ago
Avatar

Jo R DanWhy is it spleen and not liver? Both seem like good choices

3 days ago
Avatar

Brody CousinsSpleen, highly vascular organ

3 days ago
Avatar

Cesiah Garcia RodriguezD easy !! :-) .. My 8 year old grandson knows the answer..!! :-)

3 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Felicia LaMountainD

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Heather WilsonD for the win

3 days ago
Avatar

Grigoris VlachoulisD spleen usually happen on kids who hit with bicycle

3 days ago
Avatar

Jay JohnstonDelta

3 days ago
Avatar

JaNeice YvetteSpleen

3 days ago
Avatar

Deb MainSpleen

3 days ago
Avatar

JesseandAshlyn SennSpleen

2 days ago
Avatar

Maura ObrienD spleen

3 days ago
Avatar

Sarah MerrillD-spleen

3 days ago
Avatar

Anna MillerSpleen D

3 days ago
Avatar

Mary VanceD

3 days ago
Avatar

Kevin WanstallD spleen

3 days ago
Avatar

Esteban IBarraD

3 days ago
Avatar

David MagnerD

2 days ago
Avatar

Debbie ArcherD

3 days ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

The 3-3-2 Rule
The 3-3-2 rule is a tool to help you estimate the difficulty of intubation by assessing the anatomic limitations to visualizing the larynx. For example, small mouth opening, short chin (no room to displace the tongue), and superior/anterior location.
-Check that the mouth opening is at least 3 patient-sized fingers.
-Check that there is room for 3 patient-sized fingers between the tip of the chin and the hyoid bone.
-Check that there is room for 2 patient-sized fingers between the hyoid bone and the top of the thyroid cartilage.
... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

The 3-3-2 Rule
The 3-3-2 rule is a tool to help you estimate the difficulty of intubation by assessing the anatomic limitations to visualizing the larynx. For example, small mouth opening, short chin (no room to displace the tongue), and superior/anterior location.
-Check that the mouth opening is at least 3 patient-sized fingers.
-Check that there is room for 3 patient-sized fingers between the tip of the chin and the hyoid bone. 
-Check that there is room for 2 patient-sized fingers between the hyoid bone and the top of the thyroid cartilage.

Josh Newsham, Jim Hall and 116 others like this

View previous comments

Samuel CapelliIn the real world after your little rules....drop a tube stat!!!

1 day ago
Avatar

Myrna L AquinoVes si yo lo enseñó dicen que soy ....es

3 days ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

MedicTests.com added a new photo. ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

David Axen, Susan Emery and 848 others like this

View previous comments

Rayanne ZettlerD'kota Alan Engler hahah reminds me of something we would say if we were EMT partners.

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Tammy Antonson SatherJason Schacher & Petrea Miketey - I swear I said something like this to Kelly on Tuesday during static !!! :)

3 days ago   ·  3
Avatar

Isylla Beth ContosI once had a moment like this, awkward haha

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Rachel TweakROSC algorithm! 💚

3 days ago   ·  3

1 Reply

Avatar

Colleen KentHA!!!

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Emma MilnerIf in doubt, reassess 👍🏻

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Matt HayesLol pretty much!!!!

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Kate ElizabethCraig Davies your first arrest

3 days ago   ·  3
Avatar

Derek LopezLmao that i felt a bit on my first code pt

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Louise HurleyPhilip Dorian Niall Milne Colm Mac Coisdealbha Darragh Kelly-Murtagh "We've a ROSC lads, what do we do next?"... 😂 😂

3 days ago   ·  5

2 Replies

Avatar

Powell GerryWell you have two hands, one drug in each and two elbows so you can hit shock button and push them back onto the stretcher 😝😝😝

2 days ago
Avatar

Shaun DaviesZoe Preece, sound familiar?????

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Sara Emily IrizarryAsim Jaleell literally all of group 3 during acls

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Adam TroyNpa in the eye cuz yolo

3 days ago
Avatar

Jordan BraudAin't that the truth

17 hours ago
Avatar

Steven EubankBad bad bad.

3 days ago
Avatar

Tina MarshallEmma Jane Daniel I may have like this before haha!

2 days ago

1 Reply

Avatar

Ben TelferEthan Lee Kent van der Merwe Justin Whalley that para scenario the other week...

3 days ago   ·  3
Avatar

Katherine MitchellCody Perrott Laura'n Irwin Burbage show Irwin 😂😂😂 that's me 🙋🙋🙋

3 days ago

1 Reply

Avatar

Jacinta AndrewsHahahahaha Zach Almond

3 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Jenna SichermanJulia Lopezz 😂😂 me today

3 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Vicky TugbyPaul Stanzo Stanfield 😂 print it off 😂

3 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Almazan LupitaMorgan Putbrese Robert Lopez so now what.....🤔🤔

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Richard Dean RutherfordSarah 😂😂😂

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Quick Reference: Location of Spinal Cord Injuries ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

Quick Reference: Location of Spinal Cord Injuries

Masakazu Yara, Johnny Brown and 153 others like this

View previous comments

Glenda DolehantyOh, yeah.......................

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Nathan DuffeyBrayden Mckay

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Wayne CorleyVery much so,can't get fine a doctor to help me

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Sean ElinichBreakfast at 7 Lunch at 12 Dinner at 5 snack at 9

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

You and your partner are dispatched to the home of a 3-year-old child whose parents couldn't arouse her after her nap. Dispatch tells you that the parents have started CPR. Cardiac arrest in young children is most commonly associated with which of the following?

A) undiagnosed cardiac disease
B) trauma from motor vehicle collisions
C) respiratory problems and disease
D) child abuse

EMTs and Paramedic Students!
Getting near test time, or getting ahead for next year?
Right now you can get 3 months for the price of 2!
Try our 90 day special! Follow the prescribed study methods and have all of the knowledge and mental tips required to destroy the NREMT! Pass on your FIRST TRY - GUARANTEED!
... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

Kevin Stumpff, Masakazu Yara and 91 others like this

View previous comments

Steve TautauRouse her. The word is rouse.

4 days ago   ·  12

3 Replies

Avatar

Kevin EatonUmmm C

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Mason Lee SimmonsC respiratory

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Andrew McfarlandC. Airway

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Eileen CarrollC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Heather WilsonC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Semaj Cole IglesiasC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Gina GreggC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

David MagnerC

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Karen Hope O'ConnorC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Amy Hendrix MadrieC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Susan Hewit DelimanC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Scott MoranC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Sandy Jones-McKnightC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Stephanie PageC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Mark HuenefeldC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Rae YoungC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Vicky TugbyC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Diona ThompsonC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Nicola HannC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Rachel HarrellC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Danny HernandezC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Brent DeMarkC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Priscilla MerloC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Amber SuszczynskiC

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Hypertrophic, Dilated, and Restrictive Cardiomyopathy for the visual learner! ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

Hypertrophic, Dilated, and Restrictive Cardiomyopathy for the visual learner!

MedicTests.com added a new photo. ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

Blood flow through the heart! ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

Blood flow through the heart!

Chel Gonzales Sison Ventayen, Jim Hall and 237 others like this

View previous comments

Katherine Ann JordanSo what's really interesting is my brother was born with hypoplastic right heart syndrome​ and they did what's call the Fontan procedure. His inferior and superior vena cava are directly connected to his pulmonary artery. The right side of his heart does not pump blood.

3 days ago
Avatar

Denise ElizabethTomathy Lesa Jessica Caitlin Jaimee

4 days ago   ·  3

1 Reply

Avatar

Calvin WhiteKatherine Anne

4 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Mads AndersenJakob Kristensen

4 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Shane O HanlonLorraine Carlin

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Nancy MooreAuguste Maximus

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Lexi AndrewsJono Ab Clayton

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

The Conduction System!
The conduction system of the heart has two Nodes and a bundle branch. The two nodes are in the right atrium and named according to their location:
Right Atrium
- superior vena cava - sinoatrial node (SA node)
- right atrioventricular valve - atrioventricular node (AV node)
The AV node and bundle of His form the atrioventricular junction.
This junction serves as the only electrical link between the atria and ventricles of a normal heart. (keep that in mind)
The bundle of His reaches into the interventricular septum; once there, the bundle of His divides into the right & left bundle branches!
... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

The Conduction System!
The conduction system of the heart has two Nodes and a bundle branch. The two nodes are in the right atrium and named according to their location:
Right Atrium
- superior vena cava - sinoatrial node (SA node)
- right atrioventricular valve - atrioventricular node (AV node)
The AV node and bundle of His form the atrioventricular junction.
This junction serves as the only electrical link between the atria and ventricles of a normal heart. (keep that in mind)
The bundle of His reaches into the interventricular septum; once there, the bundle of His divides into the right & left bundle branches!

MedicTests.com added a new photo. ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Shannon Meade, Christine Kennedy Ahart and 201 others like this

View previous comments

Patrick TheriotMine was older, had 2 cans and a long string to med control Actually, the one I used was a older model. Motorola, bone color. Everything was heavier back then. It amazes me my body survived those years. I hit year 33 this year!

4 days ago   ·  3
Avatar

Scott UnglesI got a lot of experience using that with the Fire medic units during my time with Seals Ambulance in HB/NB/CM and other Orange County CA agencies back in the late 80's.

5 days ago   ·  2

3 Replies

Avatar

David GoldblumOh. That's the new version. I heard about those but we didn't have the funds to upgrade

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Richard CarpenterLol I use to use this back in the Day. It was the hospital radio!!

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Joe GruverUsed to contact Medical Command. Also used to have white ones that I think we're 5 Watt and 10 Watt

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Heather BaileyJohn McCamley...do you know this lol...are you that old.

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Kelly CrossDom Orlando ... I think Archie knows all about this 😅😆

5 days ago   ·  4

3 Replies

Avatar

Chris ParrishThat's a apcor, I used a core before that. Big orange box, that other apcors were tan color. KQ7 669 then KIZ 620 Orange county CA #s

5 days ago   ·  4

2 Replies

Avatar

Vernon WellsI have and they worked well, for the day!

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Eugenia Wishnevskylol. This makes me feel great. 😂 definitely before my time

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Shane MilliganI did, but I have not gotten my discounts yet. 😂

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Tyler KitchensLol! Ed Spa? Look familiar?

5 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

James BretzEdward Morrow have you used one of these :)

4 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Josh HopkinsGerry New did you use one?

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Tanner CessnaJohn?? Lol

5 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

Avatar

Patrick TheriotAnd no I'm not old enough for s c discount

4 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Chris ParrishUHF radio to communicate with hospitals .

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Sean ElinichAlso called Rampart on it 😂

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Gutierrez EduardoRoland Choate, congrats on your discount sir.

5 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Archie NiemanWhat do you mean no fries with that. Damn I'll guess I'll transport.

5 days ago
Avatar

Samantha MooreRandy Smith???? 😬😬😬

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Joey MaleckiDana??

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Macy McKinneyLatesha Romero JOHN

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Jim LoweryMyles Francis, what is?

5 days ago
Avatar

Vicy StephensonRoss 😜

4 days ago

1 Reply

Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Pericarditis
Pericarditis is an inflammation of the pericardium. It's usually acute and develops suddenly. If you could see and touch it, the membrane around the heart would look red and swollen, like the skin around a cut that becomes inflamed. Sometimes excess fluid develops in the space between the pericardial layers and causes a pericardial effusion - buildup of excess fluid around the heart.

Signs and Symptoms include:
Positional chest pain (pain is usually relieved by leaning forward)
Shortness of breath
History for recent infection or fever

ECG findings:
Diffuse, concave ST- segment elevation
Depressed PR segment
NO reciprocal changes/ST depression
... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Pericarditis
Pericarditis is an inflammation of the pericardium. Its usually acute and develops suddenly. If you could see and touch it, the membrane around the heart would look red and swollen, like the skin around a cut that becomes inflamed. Sometimes excess fluid develops in the space between the pericardial layers and causes a pericardial effusion - buildup of excess fluid around the heart.

Signs and Symptoms include: 
Positional chest pain (pain is usually relieved by leaning forward)
Shortness of breath
History for recent infection or fever

ECG findings:
Diffuse, concave ST- segment elevation 
Depressed PR segment
NO reciprocal changes/ST depression

Tyler Ratlieff, Cesiah Garcia Rodriguez and 119 others like this

View previous comments

Ralph MangrellaAlso you'll see spodicks sign in 80% of cases with acute pericarditis, slanting of tp segment

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Theisa ShortAnd the pain is unbearable.

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Dawn NicholasWhat can cause this?

5 days ago   ·  1

5 Replies

Avatar

Ramon Carlo Almiranezthe causes are infection, or complications of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

3 days ago
Avatar

Grigoris Vlachoulisinflamed pericardium is pink ?

5 days ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Managing a Poor APGAR Score (PSS)
There are three things to remember when managing an infant with a low APGAR score: Position, Suction, and Stimulate (PSS).
★Position the body so that the head is down and the airway is open.
★Suction mucous and fluid from the mouth and nostrils.
★Stimulate the infant by tapping the bottoms of the feet.
... See MoreSee Less

6 days ago

Managing a Poor APGAR Score (PSS)
There are three things to remember when managing an infant with a low APGAR score: Position, Suction, and Stimulate (PSS).
★Position the body so that the head is down and the airway is open. 
★Suction mucous and fluid from the mouth and nostrils. 
★Stimulate the infant by tapping the bottoms of the feet.