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Biot's Respirations
A respiratory pattern characterized by groups of quick, shallow inspirations followed by regular or irregular periods of apnea. Biot's respiration is caused by damage to the medulla oblongata due to strokes or trauma or by pressure on the medulla due to uncal or tentorial herniation. See the video below for an example. youtu.be/REeIL9a0_PM
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Apnea and hyperapnoea

14 hours ago

You are dispatched to the local strip club for a female that has been stabbed. After PD has secured the scene you find a female in her 20s with several stab wounds to the abdomen and a large pool of blood on the pavement. She is responding only to painful stimuli and has a respiratory rate of 8. What should you do first for this patient?

A. Control the bleeding
B. Cover the patient's abdomen with moist occlusive dressings
C. Ventilate the patient with 100 % oxygen via BVM
D. Intubate the patient and start fluid resuscitation

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16 hours ago

Billy T Thomas, Benjamin Louch and 23 others like this

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EmmyLou VoightsA. life threatening injury first. breathing wont matter if she bleeds out

15 hours ago   ·  34

10 Replies

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Dee DubbsJust took a bleeding control refresher and they're emphasizing bleed control at the same level as air way/breathing has been emphasized because....what good is breathing for someone who will bleed out in minutes? In an ideal world, you do both.

15 hours ago   ·  12

4 Replies

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MissTenesi RushingC Airway first

15 hours ago   ·  6

18 Replies

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Mike StephensonA...Anything else would give you a well-dressed, well-ventilated corpse with Kool-aid in their veins.

15 hours ago   ·  29

2 Replies

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Gilberto GonzalezThere is already a pool of blood and her reaction only to painful stimuli means she is on the train to Hypovolemic shock... apply pressure and control bleeding while partner ventilated and immediately prep for transport

15 hours ago   ·  19
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Cody SholarTara .. option E. throw a 20 at her and see if that helps

16 hours ago   ·  12

2 Replies

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Ryan ApplefordEvery and I mean every basic book states that severe bleeding control comes before any and all assessments and treatments. The 8 breaths per min is probably a symptom of decompensated shock. What good is ventilating a girl that's losing all her RBCs. Sure she's breathing at 8 per min but, she's still getting O2 into her system, but what good is it if she's bleeding out

9 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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James CristAlways control bleeding when trauma related, the reason why her respiratory rate is 8 is from lack of blood, lack of blood means lack of need for oxygen which in turn lowers the respiratory rate.

15 hours ago   ·  8
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Keith PensomHonestly you're really unable to control the bleeding here unless you're a surgeon so IMO the proper answer is fluid resuscitation. She has a GCS of about 6 so she requires intubation as well to protect her airway. I think you can put as many bandaids on her as you want but it's unlikely to result in any meaningful control of bleeding in this scenario.

11 hours ago   ·  1
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Devon MichaelABCPCF I'd say C and F are compromised, so is B. My answer would be to start with A - control the bleeding. Then start improving her ventilation - id sneak some narcan in there just in case, never know.

13 hours ago   ·  2
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Tracey K. WeaverIdeally you are going to be addressing more than one thing at a time...clearly she is hypoventilating so it would make sense to start bagging her right away BEFORE you start investigating the source of bleeding. You can't go wrong addressing the airway since she has a RR of 8. Of course with amount of blood loss they are describing she would be hypotensive and not having a lot of active bleeding

11 hours ago   ·  1
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George GrivasIt's definitely A... The algorithm that we use on the patient is ABCDE except when you have a major external bleeding so the algorithm goes CABCDE... In this scenario you have 2 clues that suggests CAB is before ABC... 1st is the large pool of blood and 2nd the fact that the patient has been stabbed in the abdomen indicates that you might have injured organs which can't be evaluated in the scene

8 hours ago
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Marc ThomasIf I was attending for this job I would start my primary survey and attend to resps ie C), my partner would dress stab wounds ie A) and then prepare extraction unless our buddies in blue are already getting the stretcher

11 hours ago   ·  1
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Michael BelcherA... issue with this question is it still doesn't say if bleeding is uncontrolled and a respiratory rate of 8 could be normal as well.. anyway when it comes to bleeding controlling blood loose is before airway now

13 hours ago
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Daniel Alvarezif there 2 medics, one must take care of breathing , should etube, the other control bleeding, then a 3 or 6 lead to monitor her miocardio and precaucion to nearestt capable hosp for sergins

9 hours ago
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Kat HoffHave one of you control bleeding while the other gets a line and starts a bolus. Have one of the firefighters bag and see how it goes. If you feel the need to take the airway tube once a medic is clear.

15 hours ago
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Keifer RouttTwo partners. One Applies dressings for bleeding, the other can tube her. After wound dressing start 2 18 or 20gage IVs. Get vitals, package and go. Monitor every 5 mins, relay to hospital.

9 hours ago
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David GoldblumGood thing you all have mobile operating rooms with you. Considering that's the only way you're going to control the bleeding

13 hours ago   ·  2
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Jamaal HaileyFirst of all I wasn't dispatched I was already there 😂😂

15 hours ago

2 Replies

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Red DoveControl that bleeding. She not breathing under 8 so she doesn't need to be bagged yet anyway.

15 hours ago

1 Reply

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Kevin CampanellaFirst step in any trauma assessment is to look for any gross hemorrhaging and address them. Stop the bleeding.

12 hours ago

2 Replies

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Rita WasielewskiControl bleeding, for trauma CAB takes precedence

15 hours ago

4 Replies

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Jeremy MeriwetherA. It's airway first unless dealing with trauma, then it's control bleeding first...CAB

14 hours ago

1 Reply

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Sean R EvansA. Gotta control bleeding if we can. Then oxygen, gurney, fluids, code 3 to a trauma center.

15 hours ago   ·  7
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Missy Cunningham VandusenC

15 hours ago   ·  3

2 Replies

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The Cardiac Cycle! ... See MoreSee Less

18 hours ago

The Cardiac Cycle!

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20 hours ago

Adam Cliborne, Anne Marie Estrada and 23 others like this

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Jayne LawlorEllé-Marie Dobinson Chloe Oliver Tom Dudziec 😂😂

19 hours ago

15 Replies

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Alison HarrisGarry this is the reason I hate sleeping on a night shift. I'd much rather stay busy then risk the red light Zombie!

14 hours ago
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Roy E BillingsThat was me for sure, and taking a 911 for hicups that would not stop expression on my face.

11 hours ago   ·  1
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Gretchen PlummerI might resemble that...plus eye boogies and pillow lines

18 hours ago
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Red DoveDon't forget to wipe that drool off the corner of you mouth.

16 hours ago
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Pooja Patel"Are you wearing a pink shirt under your uniform???" "IM SORRY ITS WHAT I WORE TO BED" Ricky Lecaros

1 hour ago
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Gonzalo DejesusWill Martinez, that's all you 😂😂😂

13 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Ryan HorsleyCharlie Cahoon Look familiar ?

19 hours ago

3 Replies

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Sam CharlesBen Chapple Michael Redmond

18 hours ago

4 Replies

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Rich Neaglelooks like Agustin Bill Aguilar don't it Joel Cisneros

18 hours ago

2 Replies

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Zachary NewcombeLiterally me on the overnight 😂

17 hours ago   ·  1
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Claudia VasquezJesus Rodriguez us during clinicals in ZCFD 😂

19 hours ago
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Rizzle S WizzleHahahaaaa true Hui

7 hours ago
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Lee BoydenLast night.

11 hours ago
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EMS ShenanigansBhaha me every time! ~Mini Medic

12 hours ago
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Johnathan HughesPerk of being bald!

16 hours ago
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Jesper KarlströmMårten Dahlgren every fucking time

6 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Jordyn FreemanApril Anderson we try our best 😂

14 hours ago

1 Reply

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Yves BurgraffMathieu Haot !

8 hours ago

2 Replies

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David NovickJulianne Pedoto

16 hours ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Jake MastersonCameron Schwarz

10 hours ago

2 Replies

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Chad LaswellAshley Laswell this is me

10 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Jeff WilsonJesse James Silva your stache

14 hours ago

1 Reply

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Herschel GilbertShannen Elizabeth Rode my life

15 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Jonathan LeeLmfao Michael Kristin

13 hours ago

1 Reply

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Prinzmetal's angina or variant angina is ischemic chest pain, THAT OCCURS AT REST as a result of a vasospasm in one of the coronary arteries.

What Do You Need to Know?!
★Prinzmetal’s angina almost always occurs when a person is at rest.
★Pain usually occurs between midnight and early morning
★Pain is usually substernal and can radiate to the neck, jaw, shoulder, or arm
★ST segment elevation occurs during episodes of chest pain then disappears promptly as chest pain resolves
★Can be treated with Nitroglycerin
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21 hours ago

Prinzmetals angina or variant angina is ischemic chest pain, THAT OCCURS AT REST as a result of a vasospasm in one of the coronary arteries.

What Do You Need to Know?!
★Prinzmetal’s angina almost always occurs when a person is at rest.
★Pain usually occurs between midnight and early morning
★Pain is usually substernal and can radiate to the neck, jaw, shoulder, or arm
★ST segment elevation occurs during episodes of chest pain then disappears promptly as chest pain resolves
★Can be treated with Nitroglycerin

Your patient is having trouble controlling their own airway so, you decide to insert an OPA but you have several sizes in the airway bag to choose from. What is the proper technique to size an OPA for an adult?

A) They are sized from 1 to 5 depending on height
B) Measure from the tip of the nose to the tip of the patient's ear.
C) Measure from the corner of the patient's lips to the tip of the earlobe or angle of jaw.
D) There is only 1 adult size and 1 child size

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2 days ago

Dale Loulakas, Josue Garcia del Angel and 23 others like this

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Michael Paul DornC.. but intubate anyway going to happen at the hospital might as well..

2 days ago   ·  3

10 Replies

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Casey HasslerC because you don't want to cause anymore damage that isn't already there..

2 days ago   ·  1
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Tyler WilsonC, but there's times you put in whatever you grab. As long as they can breath, that's what counts!

1 day ago   ·  1
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Andrew BergC

2 days ago   ·  1

4 Replies

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Brian BurkeC but might as well throw a king/ intubate.

1 day ago   ·  1
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John SmithC is the correct answer.

2 days ago   ·  2
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Marcella MolloyC , usual rules apply as regards gag reflex .

1 day ago   ·  1
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Eman SalamaSorry c is the answer

1 day ago   ·  1
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Rhonda Franks ClaytonDefinitely C

2 days ago   ·  1
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Pablo ChavezC!!! Obviously!!!

2 days ago   ·  1
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Mike WeigCharlie

2 days ago   ·  1
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Luis CuellarC for sure lol

2 days ago   ·  1
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Noelle Kiely JonesC if you can

1 day ago   ·  1
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Anthony OlsenAnswer is C

2 days ago   ·  1
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Brandon Lee GuchesC all day

2 days ago   ·  1
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Brian LeonardsonC of course

1 day ago   ·  1
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Tyler LaVoieC

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Chance EllisC

2 days ago   ·  2
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Joyce LindsayC

2 days ago   ·  1
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Ronnie LewisC

2 days ago   ·  1
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Angela Ferguson DawsonC

1 day ago   ·  1
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Edna Corrar WatkinsC

2 days ago   ·  1
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Erin GriswoldC

2 days ago   ·  1
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Stephen HusakC

2 days ago   ·  1
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Cheryl MongesC

2 days ago   ·  1
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Aortic dissection
An aortic dissection occurs when a tear in the inner wall of the aorta causes blood to flow between the layers of the wall of the aorta, forcing the layers apart. In most cases this is associated with severe characteristic chest or abdominal pain described as "tearing" in character, and often with other symptoms that result from decreased blood supply to other organs
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2 days ago

Aortic dissection
An aortic dissection occurs when a tear in the inner wall of the aorta causes blood to flow between the layers of the wall of the aorta, forcing the layers apart. In most cases this is associated with severe characteristic chest or abdominal pain described as tearing in character, and often with other symptoms that result from decreased blood supply to other organs

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2 days ago

Sarah Cole, Erika Chapasko and 23 others like this

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Sandi BillingsleyAt least those are New York Jackets and Shirts.

2 days ago   ·  1
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Edna Corrar WatkinsNurses too

2 days ago   ·  1
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Missy Taima SeanaEnrique Montano You pretty soon!

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Steve FloridaBetter one: I was at a wedding and noticed a co-worker wearing his black work belt. I called him on it and his reply was that he was always at work and didn't go out.

19 hours ago
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Sharief Shirlinda SavahlOr all your t-shirts are EMS jokes, fundraisers or off duty shirts!!

1 day ago   ·  1
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Gary Robert QuinnGo with protective gloves they go with everything!

2 days ago
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Kristen NicoleOrion Rich that's how I feel about your shirts lol

1 day ago   ·  1
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Kevin HiebertNope. They don't belong with my normal clothes

1 day ago
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Gabrielle BouchardAlec Tolley Vaillancourt toi à 100%

2 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Pauline RedmondBeen there done that!!!

1 day ago
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Sally WhiteTruth! lol

2 days ago
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Don DrewYup that's for sure. Lol

23 hours ago
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Kelli Ann CosgroveNurses have same issue

2 days ago
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Nic BenzAdriane seeee it's not just me 😂😂

2 days ago
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Kate ElizabethCraig Davies this is actually you

2 days ago
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Mallory AnneHaha Jason Poremba Dustin Powis

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Rebecca LapadatGarrett Otto us

2 days ago

1 Reply

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Jill MarieKyle Short

2 days ago

1 Reply

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Zach PriceLauren Katia Fry

2 days ago

1 Reply

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Claudia VasquezJesus Rodriguez yep 😂😍

2 days ago
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Matthew MigaKevin Michael nice pic

16 hours ago
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Kelly MckennaAdam Leonard

2 days ago   ·  1
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Benjamin D BurrowLisa Burrow

2 days ago
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Becky LynnAllex Duden

21 hours ago   ·  1
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Aaron BiggerJacob Jones

2 days ago   ·  1
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Retrograde and Anterograde Amnesia

Retrograde amnesia: Most memories created prior to the event are lost while new memories can still be created.

Anterograde amnesia: Loss of the ability to create new memories after the event that caused the amnesia, leading to a partial or complete inability to recall the recent past, while long-term memories from before the event remain intact.
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3 days ago

Retrograde and Anterograde Amnesia

Retrograde amnesia: Most memories created prior to the event are lost while new memories can still be created.

Anterograde amnesia: Loss of the ability to create new memories after the event that caused the amnesia, leading to a partial or complete inability to recall the recent past, while long-term memories from before the event remain intact.

You are assessing an elderly patient who is complaining of chest pain, and they suddenly lose consciousness. Your first step should be to:

A. attach the AED
B. open the airway
C. assess for a pulse
D. assess for breathing

EMTs and Paramedic Students!
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3 days ago

Patricia Fraiser Dawson, Stephen Toscano and 23 others like this

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Sean MacCroryDRSABC in Australia DANGER RESPONSE SEND FOR HELP AIRWAY BREATHING CPR

3 days ago   ·  11

16 Replies

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Phoenix Saige WhytockIts C yall...not b...itll be B if the pt isn't breathing which you check for while checking for a pulse, if both are absent then open airway and begin CPR.

3 days ago   ·  7

9 Replies

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Christopher MurphyAHA changed the algorithm years ago. It's no longer ABC's but rather CAB. Check your circulation, then worry about airway. You don't have a monitor attached so no rhythm to interpret at this point. Take it back to BLS first boys and girls.

3 days ago   ·  27

1 Reply

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Malinda Tate HillCheck for pulse with your fingers while checking for respiration with your eyes and ears (multi-task ppl, got one circling the drain). So, C & D at the same time, then A, then open that airway and get that party started!

3 days ago   ·  6

1 Reply

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Matthew TatomIts C. Have we forgot the basics? You always check for a pulse forst then check for breathing while checking for the pulse. Then open the airway if not breathing. If. No pulse, and by yourself you would start high quality CPR for 1 min then attatch your AED. If you have a partner have them ready the AED while you start CPR.

3 days ago   ·  6
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Derick WilliamsonC. A if C is absent B D. In all fairness you can do most of that at virtually the same time. Check the pulse while watching for chest rise and fall using look listen feel (also while you are there just do a quick jae thrust, you're already there and odds are if you have your AED you have a partner and they can apply it). Apply AED if readily avliable otherwise sick someone on grabbing it initiate CPR (compressions only if alone, and non pediatric) if a buddy is present, and or pulse is present then instead initiate breathing management. Ideally in a 3 man team 1 person (the most experienced) handles hemorrhage and circulation (ideally they can start an IV) another handles air way and breathing (also often spinal precautions if needed) the last one does paperwork and history while handling extra equipment. By yourself though hemorrhage/circulation first.

3 days ago   ·  1
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Cody McCarthyWith AHA new standards if its a witnessed arrest it CAB. If not ABC. However in this situation check for pulse, then airway.

2 days ago   ·  5

2 Replies

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Red DoveC-CAB....circulation, air way, breathing... if a person doesn't have a pulse they will stop breathing immediately that's how I remember it.

3 days ago   ·  6
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Chris LaneWhat a lot of debate. AHA standard in an unresponsive patient (they lose consciousness) is CAB, not the old ABC. Based on these standards, the answer is C.

2 days ago   ·  2
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Joshua SmithIt would be C. If no pulse start CPR if a pulse and slow breathing assist with bvm

3 days ago   ·  4
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Christina HedeC, then if not breathing start CPR and get AED and go from there That's what I learned in my first aid CPR class

3 days ago   ·  2
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Roni HeiliUgh look listen and feel... trick question. Assess for pulse while assessing for breathing. Pulseless start CPR.

3 days ago   ·  4
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Brody CousinsC then if no pulse start CPR and attach your leads. If they have a pulse check airway then breathing

3 days ago   ·  2
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Pablo ChavezC. Pulse!!! And if don't feel it start cpr. After that you activate your emergency team and continue your assesment

3 days ago   ·  1
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Tero JeronenFirst B then A. If VF or VT give a shock. If flatline start CPR. C if you see complex in monitor AND breathing. And finally D if necessary.

3 days ago

27 Replies

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Matt-Melissa MyersYou are currently with the PT and witness the PT lose consciousness (PT was originally breathing)....I'm going with C!

3 days ago   ·  1
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James DesentzThey were just talking to you, airway is good. C

3 days ago   ·  3
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Susan BuchananC. He has enough oxygen to check for a pulse for 10 seconds.

3 days ago   ·  4
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Thomas BatesAmerican Heart would say C, check pulse

3 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Eileen CarrollIt used to be ABC. Now it's CAB. Back to basics.

3 days ago   ·  2
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Callie MalloryC. Check for a pulse. CAB

3 days ago   ·  7
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IB Banginwhat is going on , this is . im done . C.

Attachment2 days ago   ·  2
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Anthony OlsenThe answer is CAB

2 days ago   ·  1
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Lisa CorrineC. Circulation, airway, breathing.

3 days ago   ·  1
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Kristine DavisIt's C... CAB!!!!

3 days ago   ·  1
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3 days ago

Quick Reference: Auscultating Cardiac Murmurs

Jens Hojby, Leanne Spears and 23 others like this

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Benjamin ScrivenerThank you for this

2 days ago   ·  1
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David BroadCallum Wallis

2 days ago   ·  1
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3 days ago

Brooke Tussey, Chris Tardiff and 23 others like this

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Sally WhiteLOL!

3 days ago   ·  1
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Chris MalinowskiRob Llopis

3 days ago   ·  1
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Takmi Az-IamIt's on National Back Order... so...good luck..haha

3 days ago
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Christie MercerLol

2 days ago
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Jenna IsaacCarri Clark does this sound familiar? 😂

2 days ago
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Angela LynnMina Ahmed 😂😂

2 days ago

1 Reply

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Jordan DehalBrian Ferrante

3 days ago

1 Reply

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Sara ColemanDusty Sperry Cathy Rae

3 days ago

1 Reply

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Sarah NullTyler Orlando

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Tahra BarberCJ Spriggs

3 days ago   ·  1
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Nelson FieldsKylie Hawkins

3 days ago   ·  1
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James JohnsonTom Sandeno

3 days ago   ·  1
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Dana Andresen GoodmanMegan Wellendorf David Larson

2 days ago
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Olivia WebergRobert Todd Preston

2 days ago
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Faith SchatteKatherine Hutchins

3 days ago
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Dan MooreJacob Shepherd

3 days ago
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Garrett CollinsAimee Fortner

3 days ago
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3 days ago

Spinal cord injury effects by level of injury!

Kate Cleland, Kelvin L Aguilar and 23 others like this

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Alec AvaloyInteresting

3 days ago   ·  1
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Kayla SmithMichelle Rose Metz

3 days ago   ·  1
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Mike Falala....c8?

3 days ago   ·  1

3 Replies

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Ryan McCormickL2-S2 : Forgot erectile dysfunction and incontinence of urine​ & stool! Learned that the hard way 😢

2 days ago
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Shay AyzeJay Begay. Good reference.

3 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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O.b. Tikenyce!!

3 days ago
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Fabio AhumadaLiterally loss of leg function at almost every level 😐

2 days ago
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Melissa ShannonKatherine Mann

2 days ago   ·  1
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4 days ago

Shannon Harman Kerr, Patricia Fraiser Dawson and 23 others like this

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Liza RobsonJarrett Thomas when you forget everything you've ever learned lol 😂 it happens to everybody lol

4 days ago   ·  2
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Hector GomezVanesa Muñoz how it is with some of the students you get 🤣🤣

4 days ago   ·  1
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April MullisKatherine Trey Kerry, this could not be any more accurate.

3 days ago   ·  2
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Alex KilleMy first patient had a dislocated shoulder

4 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Kenny DiazMy first clinical was at a women's prison

4 days ago   ·  2
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Joshua Sebastián PerezCierra us yesterday 😂

4 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Una FitzgeraldNiall Milne, this will be me 😂😂😂😂😂

3 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Wesley CampbellAmanda Neumiller how I feel literally every single day 😄

4 days ago   ·  2
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Kelsee HawsBaylee Northern you remember this?? Lol

4 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Sandi BillingsleyJessie D Peña read the small print. I also got lied to "We will NEVER send out 2 ECAs on a call by themselves." Yeah Sean McCollum !!

4 days ago

1 Reply

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Red DoveMines was a hanging. No too hard. All I had to do was basically check for vital signs.

4 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Danielle ThomasTanner Allen Paul Landreth-Smith

3 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Melissa RuelDevin Andrew Nolley😂😂

3 days ago

1 Reply

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Josh MontgomeryBrandon Joseph Chris Bathurst.

4 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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James BretzJoshua Sebastián Perez

4 days ago

1 Reply

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Riley-Kate HoldenKelly Walker

4 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Alexandra BerkeleyJessie Campbell

4 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Willi SickelsToni S Brown

3 days ago

1 Reply

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Samantha HalsteadHahahaha Crystal Schultz

23 hours ago
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Kirsti WrightJJ Walker 😂

4 days ago   ·  2
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Krystle NunezLmfao Mandy Richmond

4 days ago   ·  1
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Deanna DurhamMorgan McCall Emily Martin

4 days ago   ·  2
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Terra ForsytheAaron Cole 🤣

3 days ago
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Claudia VasquezJesus Rodriguez 😂

4 days ago
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John AmbrogioJoseph Ambrogio Luis Marin 😂

3 days ago
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Hyphema
Hyphema is a collection of blood inside the anterior portion of the eye (the space between the cornea and the iris). Traumatic Hyphema is a common complication of blunt or penetrating injury to the eye and can result in permanent vision loss. The blood can cover most or all of the iris and the pupil, blocking vision partially or completely. Treatment includes the covering of both eyes, pain control, and rapid transport.
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5 days ago

Hyphema
Hyphema is a collection of blood inside the anterior portion of the eye (the space between the cornea and the iris). Traumatic Hyphema is a common complication of blunt or penetrating injury to the eye and can result in permanent vision loss. The blood can cover most or all of the iris and the pupil, blocking vision partially or completely. Treatment includes the covering of both eyes, pain control, and rapid transport.

Scheuer D Marc, Fred Herb and 23 others like this

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Michael MixonMy son got hit in the eye with a baseball when he was eight. No concusion or orbit fracture but he did have a hyphema. Exactly like seen in the picture. Obviously it is extremely painful. The over pressure of the eye is horrible and can cause the retina to detach. To save his vision he was in the hospital for one week and placed on meds to lower his blood pressure to assist in lessoning the pressure in the eye. The treatment saved his eyesight with absolutely no permanent damage. He never played baseball again. I don't blame him.

4 days ago   ·  2
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Jeff WhitmireLisa, now I know the correct name for it.

4 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Steve KleinBeen there but worse with infection antibiotics injections like clockwork four different eye drops every three hours around the clock for days on end excruciating 😖 pain in the back of your head feels like your brain is just going to burst

3 days ago
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Steve KleinOh and not to mention then surgery first to remove the infection debris then a new lens more eye drops and pain still just praying you will see again wow brings back some very bad memories please take care of your eyes 👀 protect them like a new born baby I am fortunate i can see better than before the accident just one of the lucky ones.

3 days ago
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Malinda Tate HillPrognosis? To lazy to Google it!

4 days ago

2 Replies

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Janice WhiteheadLoss of vision in my sister's case hit in the eye at the age of 6 with a stone from a catapult

4 days ago
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Fred HerbNeed a eye Doctor stat for surgery to save and repair eye damage.

21 hours ago
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Jeff WhitmireBeen there; done that. Thanks, Frisbee!

4 days ago
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Felipe SanhuezaHifema!

4 days ago
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Vincent FrankHyphema?

4 days ago
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Vickie SipesEwwh

4 days ago
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Keifer RouttHannah Brown check this out!

3 days ago

1 Reply

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Haylee RayChristopher Kinsey 😱

5 days ago

2 Replies

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Emily HortonWhitney Fikes

4 days ago

1 Reply

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Rob HughesRachael Wilde

4 days ago

1 Reply

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Rob MasonLucy Clyne

4 days ago

1 Reply

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Pearl HeftMatthew Chua

4 days ago   ·  1
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Alana JerniganMelissa Rutledge

4 days ago
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Abby LeeOliver Burchall-Geddes

4 days ago
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You are called to a local residence for seizure activity. On scene you are met by a frantic mother that states her 13 mos old infant had been sick with a fever for a few hours when he began to "shake uncontrollably" for about 45 seconds. The infant is now postictal and breathing well. What is the most likely cause of the signs and symptoms?

A) The infant may be an epileptic
B) The infant's fever may have caused a febrile seizure
C) The infant is most likely dehydrated causing a tonic/clonic seizure
D) The infant may be hypoxic causing the signs and symptoms

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5 days ago

Scheuer D Marc, Fred Herb and 23 others like this

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JaNeice YvetteSo is this question for a brand new Basic? Where can I find paramedic review questions?

5 days ago   ·  1

6 Replies

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David MorrisRemember to get the full history and keep in the back of your mind that a febrile convulsion occurs when the temperature suddenly spikes as opose to gradual slow raise in the temperature. Also keep in the back of your mind that following a febrile convulsion, the temperature usually starts to decrease and this can be assisted with medication. If the infant has a second convulsion, then this is not usual characteristics of febrile convulsion and suspect other underlaying causes. Always keep an open mind for your diferential diagnosis and do gain a thorough history of the situation.

5 days ago   ·  7
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Jeanette CrossThese aren't trick questions and if you don't know this it's time to find a different job field. B...febrile seizure. Don't over read it or over think it. We form field impressions we do not diagnose. That is better left for those with the education and equipment to make that call.

4 days ago   ·  1
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Amanda Randall WeberB, reserving a little suspicion for a more serious illness being at play. Thinking of a little girl with a "febrile seizure" that turned out to have meningitis.

4 days ago   ·  1
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Joe JensenProbably febrile, hypoxia until ruled out.

5 days ago   ·  1
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Patrick LeeJust in case someone missed it, the answer is B.

4 days ago   ·  1
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Stacey Lynn LeskyB...It happened to my sister when she was 18 mos.

5 days ago   ·  1
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Mel Casto GordonHigh fever in infant triggered the seizure

5 days ago   ·  1
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Siu Cho LungB - fever then febrile seizure

5 days ago   ·  1
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Manny SanchezI'll take febrile seizures for 1000, Alex.

5 days ago   ·  1
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Just Another Street MedicNever shake a baby, never...

5 days ago   ·  1
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Jay JohnstonBravo.

5 days ago   ·  1
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Rhonda Franks ClaytonIt's definitely B

5 days ago   ·  1
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Luis CuellarB for sure

5 days ago   ·  1
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Anna MillerMostly B.

5 days ago   ·  1
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Jerald MaskB high fever

4 days ago   ·  1
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Joyce LindsayB

5 days ago   ·  1
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Edna Corrar WatkinsB

5 days ago   ·  1
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Kathy PignatoB

4 days ago   ·  1
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Cheryl MongesB

5 days ago   ·  1
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Heather WilsonB

5 days ago   ·  1
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MissTenesi RushingB

5 days ago   ·  1
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Jacob SanbornB

5 days ago   ·  1
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Alyssa Scheuerman🐝

5 days ago   ·  1
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Michael Paul DornB...

5 days ago   ·  1
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There are two primary presentations of abdominal pain: visceral and parietal.
Visceral: Achy or crampy generalized pain caused by stretching of organ.
Parietal: Sharp, localized pain caused by peritoneal irritation.
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5 days ago

There are two primary presentations of abdominal pain: visceral and parietal.
Visceral: Achy or crampy generalized pain caused by stretching of organ.
Parietal: Sharp, localized pain caused by peritoneal irritation.

Scheuer D Marc, Caryn Boucher and 23 others like this

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Fiona TormeyKatlyn O'Brien Aisling Buffini

5 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Jacqui CouperEmily Rumbelow

4 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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5 days ago

Scheuer D Marc, Cassidy Nicole Price and 23 others like this

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Greg KotrbaI start paramedic classes at the end august. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

5 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Skye CroomIn my basic program one of my favorite proctors, Bruce, would say "it's like you're trying to get a drink of water from a busted fire hydrant. We're throwing a lot at you. You just gotta keep drinking."

4 days ago   ·  2
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Denise LibertyAndrea Buccino, is this the rate at which you throw info at your students?

4 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Zachary NewcombeThat's literally what my experience was lmao

5 days ago   ·  1
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Patrick BridgeKnow that feeling

5 days ago   ·  1
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Adam Daniel SpragueSame way in basic training lmao

5 days ago   ·  1
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Stacie BrunnerI do!

5 days ago   ·  2
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Rhonda Franks ClaytonBe sure you take CPR

4 days ago   ·  1
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Doug ScottThis is accurate as hell

4 days ago   ·  1
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Terra ForsytheFlashbacks

5 days ago   ·  1
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Drew SteeleCritical care study as well

4 days ago   ·  1
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Peter WilsonAbout sums it up

5 days ago   ·  1
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Garry CliffeHow was your 1st lecture Michael?

5 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Madison PittmanStacie Brunner Thought you would appreciate this. 😂

5 days ago   ·  1
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Rob SchmiegWade Mitzel Look about right brother?

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Denise LibertyEvan Vogel, I figure that you can relate. :-)

4 days ago   ·  1
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Ryan ZweygardtAshley accurate?

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Dell Fennell AtkinsJoni Crumbley, looks about right, huh?!

4 days ago   ·  1
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Wiktoria Ndeshy NdawanaVisto Iiyambo how true is this 😂😂😂

5 days ago   ·  1
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Stacey KeeneJo

4 days ago   ·  1
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Juan MendezLilli Wende anatomy class

5 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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T.j. LattenAlicia Lee, Joshua Morton, Julie M Vogtli, Peter Wilson

5 days ago   ·  3

3 Replies

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Juanita BenjaminGilbert Navas 😂😂

5 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Amy Bufford HowardRebekah Echols Thomas Duggan Casey Sprinkles 🤣😂

5 days ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Jason HedgesKaty Symonds Adam Harvey

5 days ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Quick Reference: Intramuscular Injection Sites ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Quick Reference: Intramuscular Injection Sites

Scheuer D Marc, Cary Wall and 23 others like this

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Just Another Street MedicVentrogluteal is my favorite when I'm trying to both hold down a combative patient while administering Versed.

5 days ago
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The dura mater is a tough, leathery layer just beneath the skull and is the most external membrane of the brain. ... See MoreSee Less

6 days ago

The dura mater is a tough, leathery layer just beneath the skull and is the most external membrane of the brain.

Scheuer D Marc, Sandra Harris and 23 others like this

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Jake AndersonReminds me of a 20 minute autopsy video i saw not to long ago

6 days ago   ·  1

7 Replies

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Jamiee NelsonThat's not a beautiful brain.. that's a brain with meningitis.

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Kevin PiimaunaThis picture would have made me remember this much more quickly in class

6 days ago   ·  5
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Brian Butler"I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice chianti."

5 days ago

2 Replies

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Chabbii SalasGot it. Now if only i had seen this in class.

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Clark WilliamsI thought this was the scrotum, thanks for the post #educated

3 days ago
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Ryan McCormickGuess we should stop compressions and call it

6 days ago   ·  3
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Maryann CorrellI had to click on the photo due to graphic content?? Cmon FB!!

2 days ago
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Hanna AlessaMeningitis?

5 days ago
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Crixus Abénakis Chenard😍😍😍😍 sooo beautiful

6 days ago
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Nayelly GonzalezJake beauty

6 days ago
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Monique Stephens🤔🤓😍

5 days ago
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Sam Croft

Attachment5 days ago
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Wesley FlemingPaula Core

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Courtney AllisonStephanie Arroyo

5 days ago
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Rob HughesRachael Wilde

6 days ago
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Curtis AndrewsAbby Bug

5 days ago   ·  1
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Faithe HopsonDakota Hopson

5 days ago
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Garrett RobinsKaity Robins

4 days ago
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You and your partner are conducting CPR on a pulseless, apneic, adult patient. When you are delivering ventilations with a BVM, what is the BEST way to quickly assess that your ventilations are adequate?

A) Assess cap refill
B) Assess skin color and temperature
C) Assess the rise and fall of the chest during ventilations
D) Assess the SpO2 and CO2

Getting near test time, or getting ahead for next year?
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6 days ago

Scheuer D Marc, Gary Craig and 23 others like this

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Thomas GeorgeThis absolutely is a medic level question. Obviously, the answer is C, but it still is a medic knowledge check.

6 days ago   ·  5

2 Replies

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Dan QuinleyThe key to the question is the word quickly. Capitalization is a distractor, in test parlance. Therefore, the answer is C.

5 days ago   ·  3
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Donald EchternachtDepending what equipment I have, D is the new standard if you have the gear, if not then C. Keep going over the basics to make the top level your best.

6 days ago   ·  2
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Pamela ArmsC.) Assess the rise and fall of the chest during ventilations.

6 days ago   ·  2
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Jay JohnstonCharlie

6 days ago   ·  1
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Rhonda Franks ClaytonDefinitely C

6 days ago   ·  1
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Cesiah Garcia RodriguezEasy C

6 days ago   ·  1
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Heather VogelsangCharlie

6 days ago   ·  1
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Paul Brookesand c .

6 days ago   ·  1
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Scott MoranCharlie

6 days ago   ·  1
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Kathy PignatoC

6 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Todd ChessorD

5 days ago   ·  2
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Bobby GarmonC

6 days ago   ·  2
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Eileen CarrollC

6 days ago   ·  1
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Edna Corrar WatkinsC

5 days ago   ·  1
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Heather WilsonC

6 days ago   ·  1
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Melinda ClaraC

6 days ago   ·  1
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Jacob SanbornC

6 days ago   ·  1
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Duane SchaeferC

5 days ago   ·  1
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Chabbii SalasC.

6 days ago   ·  1
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Missy Cunningham VandusenC

6 days ago   ·  1
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Tammy A McCroryC

6 days ago   ·  1
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Amanda Randall WeberC

6 days ago   ·  1
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John HarbesonIf you don't know the answer to this one, please get off the truck.

6 days ago   ·  52
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G Jeffrey PowellThe Answer is C for many reasons in basic CPR you adequately measure ventilations by chest rise also you can't measure ETCO2 using just a BVM the patient needs to be intubated and attached to a monitor with ETCO2 capabilities

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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What Is Ebstein's Anomaly?
Ebstein's anomaly is a rare heart defect in which parts of the tricuspid valve are abnormal. The tricuspid valve is normally made of three parts, called leaflets or flaps. In patients with Ebstein's anomaly, the leaflets are larger and unusually deep in the right ventricle. The defect usually causes the valve to work poorly, and blood may go the wrong way back into the right atrium. The backup of blood flow can lead to heart swelling and fluid buildup in the lungs or liver.
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6 days ago

What Is Ebsteins Anomaly?
Ebsteins anomaly is a rare heart defect in which parts of the tricuspid valve are abnormal. The tricuspid valve is normally made of three parts, called leaflets or flaps. In patients with Ebsteins anomaly, the leaflets are larger and unusually deep in the right ventricle. The defect usually causes the valve to work poorly, and blood may go the wrong way back into the right atrium. The backup of blood flow can lead to heart swelling and fluid buildup in the lungs or liver.

Scheuer D Marc, Ana De Jesus and 23 others like this

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Sharon OelsenWill this cause a change in the ekg read out?

5 days ago

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6 days ago

Michael Randzio, Scheuer D Marc and 23 others like this

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Rebecca WyleskySo try miss working with you

6 days ago
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Timothy AlmendarezYep, so true. Dead on 4 and 5.

6 days ago
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Megan JoyBritz, Joshua

5 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Mark SquireNice

5 days ago
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Michael Vale4 and 5 all the time

6 days ago
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Nicole DanielleBrion Pasquale

6 days ago
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Nic KersMegan Vearing

5 days ago   ·  1
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Riley-Kate HoldenKelly Walker

5 days ago   ·  1
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Kelsey HughesSarah Norris Hughes

6 days ago
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